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  1. #1

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    What's a good 400 ISO col neg film.

    I have been using Kodak Royal Supra 400 for air photography since it came out and thought it was well worth the extra money. It is now being discontinued and I am wondering what to switch to when my present stock runs out. I need the 400 speed as the aircraft vibrates so much and I need to use neg film because of its willingness to forgive exposure errors, but the higher the resolution and finer the grain the better. Unlike most people, I don't care about flesh tones (you don't see much flesh from 2,000 feet), but the ability to distinguish between subtly different green, brown and yellow tones is vital. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what I should try?

    David.

  2. #2
    panchromatic's Avatar
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    If you like the royal supra i would try the newly packaged 400UC
    --Ryan

    "The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance." ~Ansel Adams

  3. #3
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    Yep, I agree with Ryan: I am a fan of the new Kodak 400UC for my color work (works great in the Holga).
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  4. #4
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Ditto. The UC and NC would be my top two and they cover opposite ends of the colour spectrum. For me both are better shot at an ISO of 200-320.

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  5. #5

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    Thanks a lot. Sounds good, but sadly Kodak's web site doesn't list it as available in the UK yet. Anything else that would do in the meantime?

    David.

  6. #6
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Try ordering it from a US or CA store online and see if they will ship to you. If not that have a N American Apugger ship you some.

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  7. #7

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    Might have a different name in the UK/Europe. Wouldn't be the first time names didn't match.

  8. #8
    eagleowl's Avatar
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    how about...

    ...Konica centuria super?
    I was kind of forced to use it in Chile,because I couldn't find my usual film(Fuji superia).
    It's fairly neutral(I have a shot of a mountain which shows some nice gentle tones),good resolution,and reasonably priced.
    One word of warning though-confusingly enough,Konica do a slide film,which is ALSO called centuria!
    A common mistake people made when designing something completely foolproof was to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

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    Only put off until tomorrow that which you are prepared to die having not done-Pablo Picasso

  9. #9
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Might be heresy, I know, but if you're using 35 mm, you should also consider Max 800. The Kodak Max films seem to have excellent resolution and color rendition, and though the 800 will have slightly more "grain" than the 400, the extra film speed will get you another stop of shutter speed to fight that vibration, and the improved sharpness that results might more than offset the loss due to the higher speed emulsion.

    If using (as I suspect) 70 mm, Portra 160 NC may be the only choice left in color unless you're willing to go through all the extra process of using movie stock.

    If you're shooting 120, however, for your use I'd have to go with the Portra 400 UC recommendation above -- I don't like UC for my own photography, but its enhancement of color by way of (to my eye) excessive saturation is just the thing for making those subtle distinctions of greens, browns, and yellows.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  10. #10

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    I would try Fuji's NPH . You will find the colours you want will be there . Even use their consumer 400 film. They are the best in my opinion. I have been working with these films for the last 20 years or so .

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