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  1. #1

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    Soviet Film - what type of processing?

    I recently got a Soviet-built Quarz 8mm camera and this unused film came with it. I can't read the script, but others have deciphered that it's color reversal. Would this take E6 processing?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Take a small snip of film and soak it in 100F (40C) water. If the emulsion washes off, it cannot go through E6. Even if it does not, this does not assure E6 compatibility but if it does, it says NO.

    If it washes off, it is either E4 or proprietary which is similar to the old Agfa reversal process.

    PE

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    And if all else fails, Caffenol will get you something...
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

    f/64 and be there.

  4. #4
    gorbas's Avatar
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    No, it's not E6!
    It was standard east european reversal process used by ORWO, USSR and all other colour films made behind iron curtain.
    Most likely I have recipes for it in ORWO data book or you can try to find original kit on Ebay.
    I used, back in the day, reversal kit made by an Hungarian company. Processing was at 20C

  5. #5
    gorbas's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ORWO chrome processing002.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	258.9 KB 
ID:	111572
    Here you have processing sequence in Hungarian and Russian for this film, CO-22 in Reanal (interesting company name) Diachrom reversal kit.
    Sorry, first and second developers should be at 25C. It was 32 years ago when I last time used that process.

  6. #6

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    Is that a relative of the old version of the Agfachrome process? (Prior to them going E6).

    My first film developing ever was that old Agfachrome process in 135, with a third-party, powder-based kit bought from the back pages of Amateur Photographer magazine It worked perfectly adequately and the slides were still viewable last time I checked, errmmm last year I think.

    For good quality results, it might be more effective to sell this roll, as a collector's item, and buy some E6 8mm film from Wittner. They can also process it and slit it for you. If you make up a developing kit for the Agfachrome process then you will have a lot of testing to do and a lot of chemicals left over.

  7. #7
    AgX
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    There were no soviet E-6 films.

    Basically all were based on Agfacolor technology. Of course with the improvements over time in emulsion and processes.

  8. #8
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    Martin, I'm not sure how different Agfa slide process was from ORWO, but for sure, they were first cousins. Agfa slide films of that time Agfachrome 50L-50S-CT18 were very good films and they still look good today as on the day of processing. Agfa just couldn't compete with Kodak on global market with different slide processe. Agfa process was simpler to handle, especially in home darkroom conditions and easier to master. I was university student in that time and our older college, part time student, run photo lab at national TV. He used Colenta processor (somebody mentioned it recently here) to process Agfa slides. He was OK with processing our Agfa films "on side" but wouldn't touch ORWO slide. Don't remember any more why? But that was reason for me to start developing ORWO slide at home. We had to submit school assignments, usually first day after holiday or on Mondays and commercial lab that process is worked only M-F and we were doing it always in the last moment.
    Just kids!
    Last edited by gorbas; 06-25-2015 at 09:34 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9
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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ORWO chrome processing 004.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	446.0 KB 
ID:	111584
    Here is ORWO chrome processing sequence in English.
    I couldn't find processing recipes.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    Is that a relative of the old version of the Agfachrome process? (Prior to them going E6).

    My first film developing ever was that old Agfachrome process in 135, with a third-party, powder-based kit bought from the back pages of Amateur Photographer magazine It worked perfectly adequately and the slides were still viewable last time I checked, errmmm last year I think.
    .
    Just checked out some 120 Agfachrome slides which I processed with a Tetanal kit in 1978 (so definitely the old pre-E6 version of the film) and they look fine, no perceptable deterioration. I remember it was definitely a "room-temperature kit", though unfortunately I've no further records. :-)

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