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  1. #1
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Exposing for good skin tones with color slide film?

    Hi,

    I just bought a roll of Fuji Astia 100 from my local camera shop: it was a good deal since it's expiring on 05/2005 and I want to give it a try to take a few portraits of my 2 months daughter.

    Usually with BW film I spot meter on the skin and open 1/2 stop (to put it into Zone V+1/2).

    I understand that slide film has a narrower latitude, so I wonder whether maybe some one can give me some tip on how to meter to get good skin tones.

    Thanks,
    Stefano

  2. #2
    jperkinson's Avatar
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    I guess it depends on the tone of the skin. One of my daughters has a very light complexion, and the other tans pretty dark in the summer. They're difficult to get right when I try to spot their skin.

    I shoot Provia a lot, and I just try to nail my greys (use grey card or sometimes I'll spot something middle like a sidewalk or other pavement), and watch my important highlights. I've rarely made a bad exposure if I just slow down and do just that.


    EDIT: Provia has a bit more contrast and punch over the Astia stuff IMO...
    Last edited by jperkinson; 05-16-2005 at 02:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    With B&W for caucasian light to medium skin, I usually put the skin tone one stop over, but for Astia I would put it closer to a half stop or maybe 2/3 over middle gray.

    I think jperkinson is mis-speaking. Provia has more contrast and punch than Astia. Astia is a lower contrast slide film, nice for portraits. I like Provia more for landscapes.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  4. #4

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    You are going to get a lot of different ideas. Most folks underexpose their slide film by 1/2-1 stop anyway. The times I shot Astia I got good skin tones shooting it at it's rated speed and not opening up. I also never spot meter the person. I find my incident meter to be of much more use with slide film unless I want something specific.

    Astia is good for skin tones because of it's more natural tones.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  5. #5
    kaiyen's Avatar
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    Astia has enough latitude for you to spot meter the skin and open up a bit, as you do with B&W negative film. Astia actually has quite a bit of latitude (maybe 5.5 stops), esp. compared with something like Velvia.

    allan

  6. #6
    jperkinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I think jperkinson is mis-speaking. Provia has more contrast and punch than Astia. Astia is a lower contrast slide film, nice for portraits. I like Provia more for landscapes.
    Yep, switched the Provia and Astia. Provia sometimes seems nearly as saturated as Velvia to me, but I still use it for portraits if the light is right...

  7. #7
    rbarker's Avatar
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    While I might check ratios with a spot meter for portraits, I generally base exposure on an incident reading. Nails the true skin tonality every time.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  8. #8
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Thank you everybody!

    Unfortunately I don't own an incident meter, I only use the meters of my two SRL (Nikon FG-20 (CW) and F100 (CW /Spot)). It seems that +0.5 should be a good compromise; I might bracket from there....

    Ok, need to complete the Fomapan 100 roll on the F100 and load the Astia
    I'll let you know!

  9. #9

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    Can't you change the meter ing on the cameras to an averaging meter?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #10
    sterioma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    Can't you change the meter ing on the cameras to an averaging meter?
    Mark,

    FG-20 has average metering only (what I noted as CW - Center Weighted).
    F100 has Matrix (that I seldom use), Average and Spot.

    Any particular reason why I should use average instead of spot?

    Thanks,
    Stefano



 

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