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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing
    Thinking back to conversations with my father, I believe I recall him saying that the Kodak labs would process their Kodachrome and Ektachrome to slightly different targets, depending on where they were located. As a result, it may have been the case that film processed by Kodak Japan would be more flattering to Japanese complexions then film processed in, e.g, Palo Alto, California.

    I believe they would also vary somewhat at different times of the year - summer photography and Christmas photography have different tendencies.

    You have to remember, of course, that this was at a time (the late 1960s to the early 1980s) when slide film and movie film volumes were huge, because many amateurs with very basic photographic needs were using those materials.

    The other thing I remember when I see comparisons of this type between Kodak and Fuji is an observation of my father's - one of Kodak's largest markets for film and processing was in Japan, and they were very interested in maintaining that.
    Not really germane to the topic I know but having started colour neg printing recently, I have started to see( real or imagined) colour casts in pictures be they still or motion pictures.

    I am sure I have read somewhere that Kodak used to tend to have a cold bluish look, Fuji was warm and Agfa was fairly neutral and a little more muted than the other two. It was said this reflected how the respective nations producing them "saw" colour.

    Certainly I remember thinking in the 1950s how motion pictures which were "Eastman or Deluxe" were much cooler than Technicolor which was always the film of choice for epic westerns. Colours were always saturated. Skies were deep blue and everybody was tanned. Shadows never had that blue look about them.I think Eastman was Kodak but I don't know about Deluxe or Technicolor.

    I watched a film recently on U.K. tv called "Mulholland Falls" with Nick Nolte and it was a police crime drama with a political overtone set in California in the early 1950s. I am sure it wasn't my imagination that made me think it had an overall cool blue cast despite it being sunny. It seemed to capture the period very well and I had assumed that the producer was trying to replicate films of that period.

    Any technical historians of film out there care to educate me?

    Pentaxuser




    Pentaxuser

  2. #12
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    Eastman Colour Negative

    Back to conversations with my father.

    The Kodak lab in North Vancouver could also process Eastman Colour Negative motion picture stock. I recall my father telling me about a movie shoot in the 70s (I think) where the producer had bought up the stock shot a few years earlier of a movie that had never been completed. They were trying to complete the story by shooting new footage, and then editing it toghether into a single movie (I think flashbacks may have been involved). The problem they were encountering was that while they were able to find an emulsion with somewhat similar characteristics as the original film stock, the original had been priocessed by Kodak Pathe in France, and the colour balance and tonality and contrast had a particular, warm, Kodak Pathe character, that North Vancouver was having difficulty emulating.

    I mention this to highlight the fact that photographic film and development of all types has a character of its own, and even the most technical parts of the process have components of artistry inherent in them.

  3. #13

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    Kodak 400 UC

    have tried it and like it...Like the 100 UC better but both I thought gave great color for print film.

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