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  1. #1

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    C41 Chems For Cross Processing

    Good morning.... Anyone have any good ideas for chemicals for cross processing E6 film.... Anytime I do CP, its for my own stuff... I think I want to start developing it myself. I found a "Press Kit" at my local shop... Would something like this suit my needs??

    I want to learn to mix my B&W juices but I think I will stick with premixed crap for this for awhile....

  2. #2
    jd callow's Avatar
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    I use Kodak's flex color chems. If you are doing small batches you'll need a calculator and a hydrometer. I have also used stuff by a company here in Michigan -- their name alludes me -- and it works well and is available in small quantities.

    A couple items you need to be aware of: bleach must never (not even a drop) get into the developer and that temperature and time are critical; over development (from too high a temp or too much time) of e6 materials makes for an unbelievably dense piece of film; but pull processing of e6 films in c41 chems is far more useful than c41 films in c41 chems.

    *

  3. #3

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    I use mini-lab bleach and fix. Replenish after each batch. I mix my own developer.

    If you can find it Agfa makes a small four roll kit. But the smaller the kit the more the cost per roll.

    http://www.jdphotochem.com/

    They sell C-41 kits in various sizes. The seller is on Ebay to.

  4. #4

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    Probably the cheapest way to do C-41 is to use the Dignan NCF-41 divided color negative developer. There was an article in Darkroom & Creative Camera Techniques Nov/Dec 1995. Works like a traditional two bath developer.

    Bath A

    Water …………………………………………………………………… 400 ml
    Sodium bisulfite …………………………………………………… 0.5 g
    CD-4 ……………………………………………………………………… 5.5 g
    Sodium sulfite (anhy) …………………………………………… 4.5 g
    Water to make ……………………………………………………… 500 ml

    pH @ 24°C = 6.5

    Bath B

    Water …………………………………………………………………… 800 ml
    Potassium carbonate (anhy) ………………………………… 53.0 g
    Potassium bromide ………………………………………………… 0.5 g
    Benzotriazole, 0.2% ……………………………………………… 1.0 ml
    Water to make ……………………………………………………… 1.0 l

    pH @ 24°C = 11.8

    3 minutes in each bath at 24 deg +- 0.15 C with continuous agitation.

    All remaining processes at 24 deg +- 3 C.

    Use Kodak SR-29 bleach 4.5 to 6.5 min then wash 1 min.
    Kodak F-34a fixer 4.5 min and wash 4 min.

    Stabilizer: 5 ml of formaldehyde plus 1 ml of Photo-Flo in 1 liter of water.

    Bath A has a long life but Bath B should be replaced when it gets cruddy.

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    With this split development you run the risk of crossover with color negative films.

    Part a is still subject to oxidation and will not keep much longer than a few months unused.

    In any case, the developer is missing potassium iodide which moderates the interimage and DIR effects and therefore will not give proper control of the curves, edge effects and color correction.

    For cross processing, it will hardly make any difference.

    There are a lot of substitute color formulas out there, but few people have fully checked out the developer with a variety of films and I have never seen anyone check them out for image structure.

    PE



 

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