Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,954   Posts: 1,522,793   Online: 982
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36
  1. #1
    Ara Ghajanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    368
    Images
    14

    Developing C41 and E6 at home...

    Because the digital thing is getting so huge, my local pro lab has been losing major business. Because of this they have jacked up prices on film processing (smart move idiots, give people another reason to switch to digital). I just paid $13 to have a roll of 135-36 Velvia processed only! What a rip off. C41 is $9 just for processing. I remember when it was a third of that price. Anyways, I was wondering how much more cost effective it would be to develop color at home. Can it be done in the kitchen with a Paterson tank? Or do I have to invest in a Jobo system and/or some sort of temperature controlled water system? What are the fumes like? Is it just too dangerous to do at home? I love developing B&W and would never trust anyone with my film again. Would color film benefit quality-wise from hand developing?

    I'm just looking for an option to the local overpriced lab.
    Ara
    Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you.

  2. #2
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    It costs me about .50 a roll in chems

    *

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    I do it using Jobo film tank. Motorbase. Tempering bath. I bought most of that setup used. Total cost was not much over $100 IIRC.

    It's fairly simple. The timing is shorter then B&W so you need to be a little more awake I know people that just use a sink with warm water but that's more effort then I'm willing to put into it. With my setup it's fairly simple. Almost fool proof. Just remember to use the right bottle in the right order.

    Cost depends on volume really. If you're doing a lot of film then it can be alot cheaper. OTOH if you're paying $9 per roll for C-41 it's going to be cheaper no matter what. I think the Agfa C-41 four roll kit is less then $20 Cdn [Want to say $15]. Being a small kit it's one of the most expensive options. Anything bigger gets cheaper per roll.


    If you do it yourself you'll only have yourself to blame

    http://www.jdphotochem.com/public_html/chemicals.htm

    They stock thier own C-41 kits plus the Agfa E-6 kit. The Agfa E-6 is I think four rolls. $15 US including shipping. Less then $4 per roll. If you're doing enough volume it only gets cheaper.

  4. #4
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    One at a time:

    1. Cost effective? -- Not especially. There probably is some moderate savings when you process film by yourself ... It has not been a great consideration to me.

    2. Can in be done in the kitchen with a Patterson tank? Yes. Temperature control has not been all that critical, in my experience. Keeping a water bath in the kitchen sink surrounding the tank should be/ has been sufficient. I have and use a JOBO processor - a little neater -- OK, LOTS neater - but "kitchen" is certainly OK.

    3. What are the fumes like? What "fumes"? No worse than black and white processing. Shortstop, if you use it (I don't in film developing) is probably the most noticeable - but I don't mind the smell of diluted vinegar.

    4. Is it "too dangerous"? I don't think so. I've done a few hundred? - thousand? - films, and there hasn't been an explosion yet.

    5. Would color film benefit quality-wise from hand development? Absolutely. Without reservation. In my opinion, one-shot "hand developing, done with reasonable care, will DEFINITELY blow the socks off ANY Commercial Lab.. Here the difference is linearly equal to black and white film. THAT is one of the most important reasons affecting my decision to process my own film and prints.

    BTW .. The Tetenal "C 41 Press Kit" costs about US$16 - all DRY chemistry, and I get eight rolls of 120 from it .. I "cheat" a smidgeon. About US$ 0.50 per roll.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,670
    The C-41 process consists of 3 solutions (developer, bleach, and fixer), 2 washes and a final stabilizing bath. Not too much different from B&W negative processing. The E-6 process is 12 steps. Both processes are at 38 deg C. Tolerances for the developing steps are fairly close 0.15 (C-41) and 0.30 deg C (E-6). You need a good thermometer, a water bath to keep everything at the proper temperature and some sort of a stopwatch. In the past I have done both using a large deep tray.

    Of the two processes the E-6 is actually the easiest, even though there are more steps, since the slides need only be cut apart and sealed into mounts. However, color printing is quite a chore since you really need a color analyser to get good prints and a print drum so you don't have to work in total darkness.

    All things considered, if you will not be mixing your own solutions and therefore buying kits then you will not save any money.

  6. #6
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    You don't need a colour analyzer -- just your eyes

    *

  7. #7
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Ghajanian
    I just paid $13 to have a roll of 135-36 Velvia processed only! What a rip off. C41 is $9 just for processing.
    Whoa, that's pretty sick! My local lab here in Montreal does the processing for 6$, (yes those are our good old cheap CANADIAN dollars...), for E-6, C-41, and B&W. For an extra 6$ you can get a contact sheet (not sure for E-6, though, because they don't do ciba).

  8. #8
    Ara Ghajanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    368
    Images
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by mhv
    Whoa, that's pretty sick! My local lab here in Montreal does the processing for 6$, (yes those are our good old cheap CANADIAN dollars...), for E-6, C-41, and B&W. For an extra 6$ you can get a contact sheet (not sure for E-6, though, because they don't do ciba).
    Contact sheet? That's one of the reasons I got a film scanner. A contact sheet alone was over $15. They are such a rip off. The customer service has gone down the drain also.
    Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you.

  9. #9
    thedarkroomstudios's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Merchantville, NJ - Metro Philadelphia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    223
    Just like b/w... if you do enough it's worth it. Do 4-8 rolls at a time and you will find the savings significant. Know yourself! If you want consistency, yet like to take shortcuts or don't tend to follow procedures, don't do it yourself (your pro-lab at those rates should be pretty dang consistent). If you are one to create a set of procedures and follow them each time, then go for it. Chemistry still isn't any worse than the fumes made by bleach and amonia mixed lol
    The Darkroom Studios ~ Brad Walker
    27 North Centre Street ~ Merchantville, NJ 08109
    856.488.1546 info@thedarkroomstudios.com
    "Film Ain't Dead Yet!"

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    726
    Rumor has it that some of the C-41 chemicals are very carcinogenic. Whatever the truth of that, it's best to keep them off your skin and ventilate well, but what else is new?

    David

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin