Switch to English Language Passer en langue franšaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,283   Posts: 1,534,917   Online: 855
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29
  1. #1
    johnnywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,255
    Images
    78

    digital prints on "real" photo paper

    I just started working with a fellow (on a project unrelated to photography) who insists the pictures he takes with his Canon Digi-something are sent to a lab and printed on "real" photo paper - not inkjet paper that looks like photo paper, but "real" photo paper that needs light to expose it, and is developed with chemicals. He says this happens without making a negative from the digital image. He also says this routinely done in England, where he is from.

    Is this possible? I hope not. If so, whoever replies that it is, please supply a good recipe for crow.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    ┼rhus, Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,102
    Images
    16
    I have been at the local lab to see how they do. The method is that they invert the colors of the scan (making a negative image) and project it on photo paper using a projector in the developing machine. Works pretty much like the normal analog method. Project the image onto the paper and develop the print afterwards.

  3. #3
    Leon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Kent, England
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,075
    this is quite a common thing these days Johnny. Here is one for sale that donald miller linked to in a another thread - http://cgi.ebay.com/Durst-Epsilon-Pl...QQcmdZViewItem

    I think they are know as lightjet printers?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    371
    Images
    15
    Ummn yes, this has been around for quite a while :-) The Fuji Frontier lab is one device that does it, see http://bermangraphics.com/press/frontier.htm for some info, you can also check out the fuji web site.

    I'd suggest roasted crow with dill & rosemary in a red wine sauce :-)

    Graham

  5. #5
    johnnywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,255
    Images
    78
    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto
    I have been at the local lab to see how they do. The method is that they invert the colors of the scan (making a negative image) and project it on photo paper using a projector in the developing machine. Works pretty much like the normal analog method. Project the image onto the paper and develop the print afterwards.
    What scan? Or do you mean invert the colours of the image? Is the negative a physical thing or something temporary inside the machine?

    I'm somewhat amazed I've never heard of this. All the analogue/digital print discussions I've seen have been about digital prints made on ink jet printers vs analoge prints made the traditional way.

    You forgot the crow recipe, but thanks for the prompt reply!
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    ┼rhus, Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,102
    Images
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker
    What scan? Or do you mean invert the colours of the image? Is the negative a physical thing or something temporary inside the machine?
    Sorry. I was thinking of what they do with the films we hand over to them for dev and print. With digital photos they just invert the photo and expose it on the paper and develop it.

    Roast the beast for 400 years with garlic and thyme. Add 10 glasses of white wine the first year and 25 glasses of red wine in the 321st year.

  7. #7
    johnnywalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,255
    Images
    78
    "eating crow" is when you are forced to say, "you were right, I was wrong".
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  8. #8
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    If you have a good recipe for roast partridge, crow can be prepared the same way. It should be cooked slightly more, though. There's also a difference between crows, with "forest workers" generally having the strongest flavor. You'd be surprised at how tasty they can be
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    726
    I get the few digi pictures I take printed like this. I use a lab in Britain called Peak Imaging, who seem to do a nice job. They use Fuji paper.

    David.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Texas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,576
    Images
    27
    Johnny, my recipe for crow starts with a 5th of your favorite libation (Johnny Walker Red perhaps) and continues until bottle is empty...if the part can still recall the situation, repeat...I was the same when I first learned about the Fuji Frontier prints, even have some...not bad, but come in some odd sizes. BTW, from what I have been told they do not have any better archival properties than a normal C-41 prnt...because that's what they are.
    Mike C

    Rambles

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  Ś   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin