Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,940   Posts: 1,557,447   Online: 841
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8
    This is all very interesting!! Thank you and please keep them coming.
    Brad - the spanking is in jest of course!

    And which one would you (from experience) suggest represents a 'warm fuzzy feel type film' lol - I am so verbally challenged.

    Do you have any landscape or environmental, still life photos you can share as examples of these films?

    Thanks again.
    Kindest regards, Nicole

  2. #12
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    What Brad said (except I haven't much experience with kodak's newer films, G and GX)

    Provia produces stunning tranies that are bit truer and less contrasty than Velvia.

    The e100 (my references are a bit out of date S, SW and VS) films by kodak are bit more true (at least with S now G) than Provia and (especially in the case of SW now GX) warmer and capture better shadow detail. Kodak VS is somewhat similar to Velvia, but is much better on longer exposures.

    Oddly, I really like older kodak tranies EPN and EPP for big tranies. Both films are pretty much spot on in colour and contrast and offer the best shadow detail. They suffer from larger grain (who cares at 2 1/4 or larger) and tend to buck the current trends.

    Fuji Astia is very similar to EPP.

    In 2 1/4 e200 is the sleeper film. It is very pushable (as well as pullable) the extra stop and push option allows for greater opportunity to filter and and makes for an extremely easy film to use. The images it produces, belie the speed.

    *

  3. #13
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,060
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Boenig-McGrade
    This is all very interesting!! Thank you and please keep them coming.
    Brad - the spanking is in jest of course!

    And which one would you (from experience) suggest represents a 'warm fuzzy feel type film' lol - I am so verbally challenged.

    Do you have any landscape or environmental, still life photos you can share as examples of these films?

    Thanks again.
    Kindest regards, Nicole
    Nicole, I have some examples posted here (look in the June and July archives). I don't shoot much slide film in 35mm anymore - only in 4x5.
    When shooting color 35mm outdoors, I like Fuji Superia Reala for just about everything. Reala is color print film. It is fine grained, gives very realistic color, doesn't do violence to flesh tones and, the clincher, it has a nice wide exposure lattitude (I need that).

  4. #14
    Baxter Bradford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Lymington, South Coast, UK
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    772
    Images
    102
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Boenig-McGrade
    Do you have any landscape or environmental, still life photos you can share as examples of these films?
    I suppose you could try the novelty of clicking on the links......

    for colour neg here's one...
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...00&ppuser=3346

  5. #15
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8
    Got it Baxter. Very nice colours and great shot!!! NPS looks interesting. Thanks for sharing.

  6. #16
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    Fuji Velvia 50 - it is the standard by which landscapes are measured.

    I am starting to work with the new Velvia 100, but haven't formed an opinion of it yet. A good alternative to Velvia is Kodak VS100. When shooting the color landscape, as someone has already pointed out, pay attention to the light and how it "flows" across the landscape. Velvia does the best job of enhancing the warm light, which has the add effect of bringing warmth to the image. As an aside, it would be good for you to also get an 81A and 81B warming filters, as well as 1 and 2 stop split neutral density filters.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    1,322
    Fuji all the way;

    Tranny film.

    Provia 100F, 400
    Velvia 50 and 100

  8. #18
    Helen B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen, New York, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,557
    Images
    27
    I like the exposure latitude of neg film for landscapes - and that is one very good technical reason to use film for landscapes rather than a digital camera. It is the same reason that I use neg rather than slide film. You'll never have to use a graduated filter again, unless you are into that kind of thing of course. Thirteen stops of usable latitude solves problems that graduated filters can't.

    The two outstanding colour landscape films at the moment, in my opinion anyway, are Kodak Ultra Color 100 (also known as Portra 100 Ultra in some countries, I think) and the recent Fuji Pro 160S, the replacement for NPS, which appears to be in the same league as UC 100. They are both extremely low graininess films. Ultra 100 is about the same true speed as Portra 160 NC, according to my tests, and the 'Ultra' is a bit misleading.

    The attached snap was taken with Ultra 100 inside a glasshouse. Though it may not be obvious in the little jpeg, there is detail all over the shades (effectively the same brightness as the light source) and under the shelves.

    Best,
    Helen
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails nyn138_3ss.jpg  
    Last edited by Helen B; 09-24-2005 at 03:57 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Floriduh
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,272
    Images
    2
    When I wanted to find a tranny film I went to the photo section at the local B&N and Borders and went thru the photo book section. What I saw was alot of Velvia 50 and Provia shots, especially by the Muench's. I chose the Provia because it's speed was higher at the time and the Velvia, although very nice, didn't have the reciprocity characteristics of the Provia. Provia is waht I shoot with some Velvia, but Provia's color temp is lower then Velvia's. Also watch it especially around water at dusk. I shot alot of Astia, even pushed +1, and I liked that as well. Eventually it just comes down to trying one and going from there. You'll get good results regardless of what you use. In neg film I found that I don't like Kodak Ultra 400 for contrasty scenes as it killed some of my red rock shots in Sedona AZ. Of the ones I remember that I liked, Reala was ok for some things, definetly not overcast conditions and in very briught sunny conditions I found it lacking in punch. My best earth tone shots actually came out of Agfa which is dead I guess. If I were to buy something right this minute it would either be NPH (i've seen some nice landscape shots with this film), or 160 NC. Kodak VC was always muddy to me, but alot of people like it. My early rolls were very poor and I haven't gone back.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,444
    Dear Nicole,

    The latest issue in Photo Techniques had a detailed review of the two new Fuji professional films. Both NPC 160 Professional and NPS 160 Professional were considered to be dramatically improved. Kodak UC100 got a nice mention in the review as well even though it wasn't reveiwed specifically.

    Neal Wydra

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin