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  1. #1
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Visiting Colour Landscapes after specialising in B&W portraiture

    Hi everyone, my first love will always be my black and white (environmental) portrait and street photography work.

    But... I have a perfect opportunity to take photos in an incredibly romantic landscape in a couple of weeks time (first getaway for hubby and myself in years - it's our wedding anniversary) and so I thought I'd work with a little colour. It's spring time here in West Australia at the moment. My favourite time of year.

    1) I'm after a film/transparency (120 & 35mm) that produces crisp, clean and strong colours which capture lots of detail.

    2) Which colour film/transparency have you found is best for such work?

    3) Please convince me not to buy a digi for my colour work! I don't mean just a spanking ( ducking for cover ) but good reasoning please.

    Thanks very much for helping - again.
    Kindest regards, Nicole
    Last edited by Nicole Boenig-McGrade; 09-24-2005 at 11:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    I'll vote for Agfa RSX11 50. If you can still find it. You may have to settle for the 100.

  3. #3
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Hi Nicole,
    I would recommend Fuji Velvia 50 in both 35mm and 120, or the new Fuji Velvia 100,( soon to replace the 50) it's excellent film, and the one that many landscape photographers seem to prefer for their work.

  4. #4
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    I think I would also vote for Velvia as a transparency film, although as I shoot film for scanning I go for Kodak Portra 160 VC negative film.

    If you are an infrequent landscape shooter, I would remind you of the saying "Don't shoot the landscape, shoot the light!" Any attempt to follow this principle will involve getting up EARLY - how this will sit with your first romantic break in years, I don't know!

  5. #5
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Nicole,

    I myself have switched over to Fuji Reala (Superior) since itís inception to Australia. I think it is on itís 5th, incarnation currently. Prior to that I mostly used transparencies for colour work. But this film is nearly grainless, so to speak, especially if you expose it at 80 ASA. I think itís true speed is 100 but you can get away with 125 or even 160 at a real pinch

    I run Nikkor lenses using F3 bodies, plus a Russian Horizon swinging lens camera (35mm format) with a 28mm lens. These relatively high contrast lenses (not the Horizon) coupled with the low contrast film, work beautifully. It's detail catching ability is very good, especially if you wish to make prints as an end product.

    Flowers are a hard subject for film, quite a few flowers have colours that are hard for film to capture. The Reala with it's 4th colour layer, is able in most instances, to capture and let one print the subtle colours well. In 1991 I did the wildflower thing heading south after a trip to the Gascoyne, Mt Augustus, Hammersley, Mt Newman area. As rain had preceded us by a couple of weeks it was glorious.

    I also have used bulk loaded Kodak Portra 160NC (natural colour) running it at 125 ASA for finer grain and good printing negatives.

    Latitude wise, negative film will allow you to cover any slight exposure mishaps, compared to a transparency that is.

    If you do go the negative route, I would strongly recommend you to get either dip n dunk, or, rotary development. Roller transport developing can lead to tram tracks down the film sometimes.

    You mentioned romantic:- what about climbing the Gloucester tree and having lunch in the cubby house on the top, rolling around in the breeze at 64m high is something to experience. It's pretty much the ultimate tree top experience!

    Mick.

  6. #6
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    Provia 100 is also a good slide film too. It doesn't have as much saturation as the Velvia film. I've heard that Astia 100 is also a good slide film, but I think I've only used it once and don't recall how well it worked for me. Provia has pretty much been my staple for my color landscapes.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  7. #7

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    Nicole,

    There are a few factors to consider, assuming you go for film :

    Scanning at home?
    Printing via lab
    Contrast of your locations?

    If you are scanning at home, a home scanner normally struggles to pull detail from very contrasty films such as Velvia, if the shadows are dense. Therefore Velvia, the most popular choice amongst landcsapers might not be a good idea. many swear by Astia for scanning, which is less contrasty by far. It is also less saturated, but this is an easy fix on the computer.

    If you are printing via a lab, then you can choose a contrasty saturated film such as velvia with no issues as their kit will glean all the shadow detail that your home kit could not...assuming the film is not too contrasty for the scene.

    If you are going to shoot in average or low contrast scenes, Velvia IMHO is without parallel. I personally far prefer the look of Fuji chromes and would choose velvia 50 (not used much velvia 100f and none of the new velvia 100) 100% of the time. One other bonus of the old velvia 50 is that when shooting at long esposures, it has poor reciprocity and colour shifts which can be rather nice! If the contrast is really high, steer well clear of Velvia and go for Provia or Astia.

    My Choice? Take some Velvia and Astia covering both ends of the scale. IMHO print film is miles behind in terms of image quality.

    Tom

  8. #8
    Daniel Lawton's Avatar
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    I'll also throw my vote in for Velvia or the new Velvia 100. I've tried other films but keep going back to velvia because it does have a unique look that gives more "pop" and drama to landscape shots. Some say the velvia look has been overdone but oh-well guess I'm a junky! lol Kodak E100vs is very comparable but with a slight increase in grain over Fuji's offering. With 120 it won't be much of a problem though. I was sad to hear that velvia 50 was being replaced but after trying the new velvia 100 I find it to be a beautiful film with excellent reciprocity characteristics and commend Fuji for actually trying to improve E-6 films rather than kill them.

  9. #9
    Baxter Bradford's Avatar
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    Quite a tricky one and some excellent advice given above.

    Tom is right about the ability of lesser scanners to extract the full glory of Velvia 50.

    Here is something I did a while ago to evaluate Velvia 50 against the then new Velvia 100F and also Astia 100F. They were all scanned with a low tech Epson 'perfection' 1200 flatbed and so are not nearly as dynamic as the originals, but at least a level playing field. The films reacted very differently and each can have its place in your camera bag. If you want pink sunsets and dawns, Velvia 100F will not render them very well.

    You will need to click on the "tried and emulsional" link at the bottom of the LH frame, sorry, I cannot link directly to this.
    http://www.baxterbradford.com/pages/frameset05.html

    As for the now new Velvia 100, I did some comparison shoots and posted them in the technical gallery here I think (scanned with an Imacon, so better representation of colour).

    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...00&ppuser=3346
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...00&ppuser=3346
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...00&ppuser=3346

    Being less than enamoured with the results, since Velvia 50 is being discontinued, I am now looking at using Fuji NPS colour neg, which is giving good results, but seems more grainy.

  10. #10
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Boenig-McGrade
    1) I'm after a film/transparency (120 & 35mm) that produces crisp, clean and strong colours which capture lots of detail.
    The current fashion tends toward outrageous, highly saturated color that seemingly only Velvia can produce.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Boenig-McGrade
    2) Which colour film/transparency have you found is best for such work?
    Personally, I prefer Kodak E-100G or, Fuji Provia.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Boenig-McGrade
    3) Please convince me not to buy a digi for my colour work! I don't mean just a spanking but good reasoning please.
    Surely, you jest.

    Seriously, all the usual reasons apply....
    Last edited by BradS; 09-24-2005 at 11:45 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling

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