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  1. #11
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    As Ed said, if they are behind glass, it is very important to get rid of the glare of the glass, I alway set my lights at a 45 and also use polarising gels in front of the lights to get rid of any glare from the glass.

    Dave

  2. #12
    Fintan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    1. Framed or not framed, with glass, or without - be *very* careful with reflections. Two (2) light sources, each 45 degrees from the work at equal strength, work well, but do NOT ignore ambient light.
    Guys thanks for these replies, can I just ask you what light modifier would you use? Softboxes, Umbrellas or just reflectors?

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I just use plain reflectors at 45-degrees to the work to be copied, and I don't polarize unless the work isn't really flat. If it has some texture, like an oil painting, then you might also have better results if you cross polarize.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #14
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Bring lots of black fabric to mask the art work ( think overmatting ) and to - if needed - make a shoot through mask for the camera... to eliminate yourself reflecting in the artwork. Bring a kodak or macbeth color chart, and include in a frame.

    Many slides are computer generated now: in any case, having a reference like a color chart makes the lab's work easy. Easier.

    I'd prefer using EPN, the absolute KING of correct color. But if E6 is out, look at Kodak Ultra Color 100. Scanning a 'chrome will be easier for the lab to nail the color.

    As for lighting, use plain, small, reflectors, at a 45 degree angle.

    Good luck.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #15
    Fintan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies everyone.

  6. #16
    cvik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fintan
    I'm looking for 120 color [positive] film recomendations for photographing un framed paintings under studio flash lighting.

    Anyone with experience give me a recomendations?

    I'll need it to be true color.
    Sharp.
    Scan well.
    Exposure lattitude would be handy but not totally necessary.

    Fintan
    I haven't photographed any artwork but judging by your list, one film comes to mind, Agfa RSX 50 - sharp, neutral colors and scans well.
    I see many recommend tungsten balanced films but this is clearly not the choice if you use flash.

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