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  1. #11

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    Peter,

    Mostly the solutions used for C41 process are a lot more resilient then the packaging and technical data would suggest.

    I routinely use 500ml of AGFA C41 chemistry that is supposed to survive for 5 x 120 or 3 months for 8 x 120 or 6 months. I simply mix with distilled water, heat to process temp, process, then let cool to room temp until needed next. I do shoot a squirt of butane into the Jobo 600ml bottles before recapping to remove oxygen that is not in the solution - the rest just oxidises I suppose.

    I can never see any difference between the first and last roll, although I suppose a process control strip might tell a different story.

    Same with RA-4, but that stuff never dies, just a squirt of new to replenish and it'll keep going forever :-)

    Try it :-)


    Graham

  2. #12

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    I just developed my first two rolls of 120 XP-2 Super through C41. While the negatives are still drying, everything looks good.

    In doing a little research, there seems to be some question about how much developer is needed per roll, both to cover the film in the Jobo tank, and to properly develop the film. According to Kodak's most recent bulletin, 1 gallon of the flexicolor will only develop 11 rolls of 120 film, whereas some on Photonet claim being able to run twice as many films without a loss of quality. Any opinions?

    I developed two rolls in 500 ml of chemistry all one shot in a Jobo 1500 series tank that'll fit three 1501 reels in the 120 size. I used two seperate reels, and thus the film was only in the outer edge of the reel. I've not had any luck loading two 120 films onto the same reel. In fact, I find loading these plastic reels with 120 film to be a pain, whereas loading the Hewes SS reels was no problem whatsoever. Unfortunately, I don't have the appropriate stainless steel rod for the three 120 reel tank.

    In any case thanks to everyone who offered advice.

  3. #13

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    It's a lot easier than some would have you believe, eh :-)

    I'd suggest you do your own tests to determine the life of the solutions.

    I always completely fill the jobo tank, as on one occasion when using the minumum required according to the tank I ended up with a partially developed film. The chemistry was getting quite old (5-6 months) so was losing activity, but running a test strip immediately through the system with the tank full showed it still worked, it just needed more developer


    Graham

  4. #14

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    Student Photographer with ???'s

    I am studying photography in school and we have been forced to go digital for portrait class, I've found its not to my liking at all. We took b&w and the teacher (luckily) made us learn in the darkroom developing our own film and prints. The problem is he gave up a long time ago in teaching the development of color prints and film(preferably slide film) so I've taken a colorslide class but never developed my own. I would like to learn this process and use it myself and hopefully evade the digital onslaught, is there any books or materials you could suggest that I could learn these things from?
    Thanks,
    Erin

  5. #15
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    Erin, there is a Kodak color dataguide book with lots of information on E6 and C41 processing. It also has a section on RA processing with printing examples.

    You might find it useful.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Tom Grimm's The Basic Darkroom Book, 3rd Edition (Plume, 1999) has chapters on color processing, as well as on B&W, that cover the basics. If you buy a complete C41 or E6 "kit" from Paterson, Tetenal, or the like, it'll come with basic directions that should get you through the process, although these instructions won't cover all the finer points and theory behind it all. My experience is that if you buy chemistry in non-kit form (separate developer, bleach, fix, etc.), you won't get as much in the way of manufacturer instructions, although they may be available on the manufacturer's Web site.

    Note that the details differ from one manufacturer to another, so be sure to check the description that comes with any kit you buy. It may require slightly different times than would be mentioned in an unaffiliated book, Web site, or whatever.

  7. #17

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    Thank you I really appreciate it.

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