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  1. #11
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarred McCaffrey
    Dave, your banana-man is giving away all of my best dance moves! Is nothing truly sacred?
    I have been looking for something to use as a Signature, me thinks I may have found it!!!!!

    Dave

  2. #12
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    Now that we have raised the level of discourse with a dancing banana, I feel I can ask my follow-on question, which I was too embarrased to ask before. When I cross-process slide film in C-41 chemistry I get negatives, right?

  3. #13
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Yes you do get a negative. If you tell me the type of film you have I can give you an Idea of what to expect and some recommendations on how to rate the film. When cross processing out dated e6 film can be more forgiving on exposure than fresh, but does not generally produce as attractive a print.

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  4. #14
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    The Ektachrome rolls I have a all either 160 or 64.

  5. #15
    jd callow's Avatar
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    The 160 will be Tungsten and the 64 could be T or daylight.

    For examples of 160T check out the Vancouver shots in my gallery. The film acts very much like a traditional neg film when crossed. I rate it at 100. It is fairly flat when crossed and is best when used in higher contrast settings.

    If the 64 is daylight balanced it is very contrasty and will have strong Blue/Yellow cross over -- Blue shadows and yellow highlights. It has very limited tonal range which makes it good for turning low or medium contrast setting into dramatic high contrast images. I would rate it at 64.

    I would also recommend bracketing toward over exposure. This will be especially beneficial if the film is out dated and suffers from lose of DMax. I had a ton of the daylight 64 that was out of date. It required a good deal of over exposure and had a very strong yellow cast. The exposure latitude of the 160 will be greater than the 64.

    If the film is new the 64 can be over exposed and under developed (1-2 stops over exposed, pulled 1-1.5 when developed). This will help manage the contrast and make for a more printable 'neg.'
    Last edited by mrcallow; 10-27-2005 at 10:05 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added a slop factor to a suggestion

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  6. #16
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. I also have some different color films that I would like to try to cross as well. It is mostly Portra 160 NC or VC, but I also have all kinds of expired no-longer-made film that a friend gave me. Is there a general rule of thumb for exposure that I should follow?

  7. #17
    fatboy22's Avatar
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    Frozen Outdated Ekatachrome

    I have been shooting 70mm outdated ektachrome all summer with no problems at all accept finding a lab to process 70mm E6. The film I bought from a proffesional who had a freezer full of the stuff from the late 80's and early 90's has been amazing. I use it in my Graflex Crown graphic with RH-50 film back. You get 50 plus shots with the RH-50 (6x7 format). I was skeptical at first but when I got that first roll back it blew me away, good color saturation and everything. It made me a big believer in freezing film.

    Jamie
    Keep Film Alive, Shoot Everyday!
    JamiesInfraredPhotography.com

  8. #18
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoPete
    Thanks for the info. I also have some different color films that I would like to try to cross as well. It is mostly Portra 160 NC or VC, but I also have all kinds of expired no-longer-made film that a friend gave me. Is there a general rule of thumb for exposure that I should follow?
    Pete,

    Are you going to cross process the Portra? if so, in what?

    I thought you were asking about cross processing E-6 film in C41 process, all of the Portra films are C41 process.

    Dave

  9. #19
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    Pete,

    Are you going to cross process the Portra? if so, in what?
    Yes, in e-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    I thought you were asking about cross processing E-6 film in C41 process, all of the Portra films are C41 process.
    Yes, that is what I was asking about originally, but as I have been thinking about it, I would like to try the other direction as well.

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