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  1. #11

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    Woah, info overload!

    Cheers guys. Some of it went clear over my head. However it has been a great help.
    After due consideration I am:
    a) Buying some different chemicals in order to rule chemistry out.
    b) Putting a B&W film through the Contax (which I know I can develop) to check that the exposures are still okay.

    As for the scanning: The duff film has scanned the same on two different scanners (which have produced good results in the past) with the same results, so I'm inclined to think they're okay.

    I''l keep you posted with my findings.

    Thanks again

    Bob.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    Interesting. I did not choose to "grind very fine" in my post. The end result is that color negatives will appear to be "too yellow" when inspected visually. I remember the "old" AgfaColor, without whatever masking, that did not exhibit the "yellow cast". For a long time, that was my most favorite film.

    It is only in "special circumstances" as - now, where I will produce prints of a model illuminated by the color transparency images of flowers, trees, stone walls, etc,, projected through a Hasselblad PCP80 Projector, that any cyan filtration will be necessary. That is a technical challenge: 5500K daylight film used to capture an image illuminated by a 3800K (??? - something like that --) lamp - all bets would be off anyway, after the light passes through the transparency.

    BTW - I've found the Camera and Darkroom issue describing the Kodak K-14 process - January, 1989; and I'll post it here or as an Article (nostalgic) when I find time. Hopefully, I will find some time.
    Shades of Seattle Film works - the first step was "Rem-Jet" removal -- 5-10 seconds @ 85 deg. F. Sixteen steps total, including the last: "Dry 4 min. @ 105F.

    My interest in Camera and Darkroom (oops - named Darkroom Photography then...) has not waned - I MISS that magazine.
    Sorry Ed, nothing intended by my response but transmitting correct information. I see too many myths and errors compounding themselves and have found myself becoming a compulsive 'corrector' of these. My apologies.

    BTW, I am one of the co-inventors of the yellow developer for Kodachrome (CD-6). I know the process well. It is very complex but was regularly done by hand in research at Kodak with 35mm film. All you need is time and patience.

    PE

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobfrance
    Woah, info overload!

    Cheers guys. Some of it went clear over my head. However it has been a great help.
    After due consideration I am:
    a) Buying some different chemicals in order to rule chemistry out.
    b) Putting a B&W film through the Contax (which I know I can develop) to check that the exposures are still okay.

    As for the scanning: The duff film has scanned the same on two different scanners (which have produced good results in the past) with the same results, so I'm inclined to think they're okay.

    I''l keep you posted with my findings.

    Thanks again


    Bob.
    Please do. Some threads are like "whodunits". Unless you can read the final chapter which solves the mystery, you are left dissatisfied. Some other websites for photographic problems just leave the guy with the problem "swinging" or for other reasons, the contributors never hear about the conclusion. APUG most of the time isn't one of those sites.

    Pentaxuser

  4. #14

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    UPDATE!

    I developed a B&W film from the camera last night and the results were spot on.
    I've recieved some fresh C41 dev and blix of a different brand.
    Tried re-blixing the colour existing dodgy film - It came out a little lighter but no great difference.

    I suppose my next step is to try processing colour again using my new chemicals.
    Poor chenistry seems to be the most likely option to me. If it's not then I'm stumped!

    Oh, and Primefilm 3600u scanners are officially dreadful - I am now hunting for something better.

    Bob.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobfrance
    UPDATE!

    I developed a B&W film from the camera last night and the results were spot on.
    I've recieved some fresh C41 dev and blix of a different brand.
    Tried re-blixing the colour existing dodgy film - It came out a little lighter but no great difference.

    I suppose my next step is to try processing colour again using my new chemicals.
    Poor chenistry seems to be the most likely option to me. If it's not then I'm stumped!

    Oh, and Primefilm 3600u scanners are officially dreadful - I am now hunting for something better.

    Bob.
    Bob, articles published several years back in photo magazines indicated that there were serious differences between different C41 developers. The tests included about 6 different products and they gave quite a wide variation in sensitometry.

    I hope you are able to track down the problem.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobfrance
    UPDATE!

    I developed a B&W film from the camera last night and the results were spot on.
    I've recieved some fresh C41 dev and blix of a different brand.
    Tried re-blixing the colour existing dodgy film - It came out a little lighter but no great difference.

    I suppose my next step is to try processing colour again using my new chemicals.
    Poor chenistry seems to be the most likely option to me. If it's not then I'm stumped!

    Oh, and Primefilm 3600u scanners are officially dreadful - I am now hunting for something better.

    Bob.
    Yes. Don't give up. If I can do it, then anyone can

    Pentaxuser

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