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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Esa, I have stored Endura at room temperature for up to 1 year, as well as Supra I, II and III for that long and longer. The Endura showed no change, but the Supra papers showed a shift to the red and they lost some speed. I saw no significant increase in dmin in any of them.
    Any other ideas about how to fix my whites?
    In a correctly working ra-4, should there be any difference in the colour of a normally processed unexposed paper and a paper just bleachfixed?
    Today I used tetenal and Paterson chemicals. Both have worked well previously.

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ekjt
    Any other ideas about how to fix my whites?
    In a correctly working ra-4, should there be any difference in the colour of a normally processed unexposed paper and a paper just bleachfixed?
    Today I used tetenal and Paterson chemicals. Both have worked well previously.
    Esa, there is a change in Dmin when you fully process an unexposed sheet of paper vs just blixing and washing. This is usually a shift yellowish with an increase of about 0.05 units in density or greater. In no case should the dmin be over 0.2 in color paper. It should be well below this value.

    PE

  3. #13

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    Thank you. This time the shift is so huge that it is a real problem. I have to try with a fresh box of paper soon.

  4. #14

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    The problem was aged paper. A fresh box pf paper solved the problem. Now the difference between fully processed and only bilxed paper is barely visible.

    So, as an answer to the original question. Supra and Ultra Endura refridgerated for a year and kept a couple of months in room temp may go bad.

    Esa

  5. #15
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    Fuji, does appear to have a shorter shelf life. I have some fuji flex stored in a cool basement that went bad after about 6 months. Oddly, the most significant aspect of it going south was that it could not achieve a good black. (this is unusual, most papers go south in the base or Dmin not the Dmax. My cleanout which is Fuji CA has printed pink in the Dmin for over a year, yet produces a real nice black when run through the processor.) I dumped and remixed all my chems to make sure it was the paper -- which was a waste.

    Meanwhile, I have enduraflex which is every bit as old as the fuji stored similarly and is perfect.

    I have a chest freezer which I have been too cheap to hook-up, but may have to this spring if I continue to use Fuji products.

    FWIW I have no greater love for CA over any other paper. Except when printing specific films, I don't see any significant advantage of CA over Kodak. I use it because most people (those who might buy my work) have bought the hype and because it is cheaper. When I read or hear people write that CA is in a class of its own or that it is head and shoulders better than all others I think: Emperor + no clothes.

    *

  6. #16
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    A bit off-topic, but FYI; in general, due to the design, Fuji papers print best with Fuji films, but Kodak papers will print well with either Kodak or Fuji films.

    This has been reported elsewhere.

    It is due to the use of what is called the "silver criterion" in the selection of the spectral sensitivities of the Kodak papers.

    PE

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