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  1. #11
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvik
    What is the name of the film? What type (E6, C41)?
    Some films push well, some don't.

    How was the light? (concert? indoor? outside at night? day?).

    If the images are important and it turns out too dark for printing you might try to scan the film as a last resort - specially if you used a slide film.
    Christian,

    She stated right in her first post, that it was ISO 200 Color Print Film, in other words C41...

    She would be very hard pressed to get anything out of these negatives at all.

    As far as cross over processing in B&W chemistry, your talking about a completely different type of film.. than that of traditional B&W..

    Dave

  2. #12
    foxyscootie's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies everyone. I am just counting this shoot as a loss, but fortunately I'm doing a reshoot today & I will be checking my settings before I push the shutter!

  3. #13
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Dave, is there a reson why you can't push-process C-41 film in B&W? I've tried it once and it worked, though the images had the typical orange mask ... Am I missing something here?

  4. #14
    Helen B's Avatar
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    The yellow filter layer in colour neg films is often (almost always?) colloidal silver that is removed in the C-41 bleach. If you don't bleach, then the yellow filter must remain. and that, along with the yellow-coloured colour couplers that are there (in the orange mask), must raise the base density to blue light significantly. The silver isn't designed to form a usable image itself, so it can be a very low contrast image.

    Best,
    Helen

  5. #15
    cvik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    Christian,

    She stated right in her first post, that it was ISO 200 Color Print Film, in other words C41...
    Nope, the first says "iso 200 color film". In fact, the first page doesn't say print film at all. However.. when i checked back I found a reply were it said that no lab does c-41 push processing in her area - I probably overlooked that one the first time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Satinsnow
    She would be very hard pressed to get anything out of these negatives at all.

    As far as cross over processing in B&W chemistry, your talking about a completely different type of film.. than that of traditional B&W..

    Dave
    I didn't mention B&W film/chemistry at all.

  6. #16
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvik
    Nope, the first says "iso 200 color film". In fact, the first page doesn't say print film at all. However.. when i checked back I found a reply were it said that no lab does c-41 push processing in her area - I probably overlooked that one the first time.


    I didn't mention B&W film/chemistry at all.
    cvik,

    Normally when a situation of this occurs, as a person that worked in photolabs and the way the question was posed, I assume print film...

    As far as the B&W, I was addressing to another member who was talking about cross processing.

    Helen, posted a very good answer to the question posed.

    htmlguru4242,

    C41 film is an entirely different make up than traditional B&W, hence you should be able to achieve some possible artistic results, but not what would be considered ususable results in a normal sense...

    After working many years in pro labs, I guess I took the question for what it was, someone walks in the doors and says, "this is 200 speed film and I shot it at 3200, is there anyway to get something out of it?" and for 99% of the normal labs in the country, the answer is.....No! and apparently she was thinking along the same lines as I was and understood me with no problems.

    Happy Holidays

    Dave

  7. #17
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I would suggest you get Walmart or some similar inexpensive minilab to develop it for you. There probably won't be anything usable come from it, but at the very least you can refer to the negatives as an example of what that many stops of underexposure looks like.

  8. #18
    foxyscootie's Avatar
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    Matt, thats what I was thinking too. It is a learning experience after all so I may as well have the negatives to view the outcome.

  9. #19
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    If you get one roll developed in a normal C41 process and then wait until you find someone who does their own C41 processing and get them to push the film 2 stops. This should give you an idea of just what you really can do with C41 film. Time is on your side and if you know just what you can, or cannot get, this could be a good thing.

    I have over the years pushed C41 and have found reasonably useful negs by pushing one stop, which is an extra 15 seconds of developing. By going another 15 seconds I am able to push C41 two stops, (total extra time 30 seconds). I'm not saying the negs are great, but you do get a quite printable image.

    I have never been able to get a good printable picture by actually push processing past 2 stops, no matter how under exposed the negs have been.

    I was once successful with some 100 ASA film exposed at 1600 ASA by accident. I push processed 2 stops and got, just printable images, from a film that was underexposed 4 stops.

    Mick.

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