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  1. #1
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Recommended Colour 120 film

    oops my message seems to have become the first in the thread!? I have re inserted Markbb's original post here...

    Quote Originally Posted by markbb
    I intend to shoot some street scenes on a MF 6x9cm camera, and would appreciate peoples recommendations for film (colour). A nearby steet is full of butchers, fishmongers & green-grocers serving the local N. African communities. I will be shooting, from across the street, shop interiors lit with a mixture of incandescent and fluorescent lighting in twilight. I doubt that transparency film will give enough range so will be using colour reversal film. As these will hand held at around F8 or F11 I need something reasonably fast, but that I can enlarge to at least 12" x 18" prints. Any ideas?
    Last edited by mrcallow; 01-10-2006 at 11:48 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: oddity of my post...

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    jd callow's Avatar
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    I second Helen's recommendations. If you scope out the areas prior to shooting and can get some meter readings you may find that you can go with a slower film.

    When shooting street sometimes its nice to be able to 'see' the different colour temps on the final print. Such as green fluorescents and or orange incandescent lights. The mix is what makes the street so interesting.



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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbb
    Thanks Helen - looks like good advice. I rarely shoot colour negative film, so appreciate all the help I can get!
    I am no color guy myself but with kodak portra films (developed in kodak process) and on Kodak paper, i get excellent results, especially of people. I have had several 'looks like MF' comments on my 35mm prints(probably the zeiss lenses don't hurt either).

    Kodak negative material/prints look pretty bad if you take it to a fuji lab.
    art is about managing compromise

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    Street photography isn't my thing, but I have been impressed by Kodak 400UC. It has excellent color, and it seems to be tolerant of quite varied light and light sources. It also has the flexability you desire. Another possibility is the Kodak High definition films. These are made for the amateur and are very versatile. They are also very good, and they are widely available.

  5. #5

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    Recommended Colour 120 film

    I intend to shoot some street scenes on a MF 6x9cm camera, and would appreciate peoples recommendations for film (colour). A nearby steet is full of butchers, fishmongers & green-grocers serving the local N. African communities. I will be shooting, from across the street, shop interiors lit with a mixture of incandescent and fluorescent lighting in twilight. I doubt that transparency film will give enough range so will be using colour reversal film. As these will hand held at around F8 or F11 I need something reasonably fast, but that I can enlarge to at least 12" x 18" prints. Any ideas?

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    If you mean that you'll be using a colour negative film, take Fuji - NPH400 or even NPZ800 for extremely low light. Both are excellent films for special and everyday photography.

  7. #7
    Ole
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    Or Kodak - NC400 or VC400.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #8

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    Thanks, Eumenius. How will the NPH or NPZ hold up against the artificial lighting conditions? There will be people, veg/fruit meat etc in shot.

  9. #9
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    Mark,

    If 12" x 18" or even 16" x 24" is a far as you want to go from 6x9 then you should be able to use one of the 800 speed films with no worries at all. I think that the current version of Portra 800 has a slight edge over NPZ (now called Pro 800Z: same film, higher price) but it is a very close call, and in mixed lighting you might prefer NPZ, but again, it's a close call.

    'Overexposure' is your friend in artificial light with daylight-balanced neg film, so set your meter to 400 or probably even lower. This is a good reason, in my opinion at least, to use 800 film instead of 400. Colour neg film has huge overexposure latitude and doesn't get grainy with overexposure. By 'overexposing' you give yourself room to adjust the colour balance, and to keep plenty of detail in dark skin. If you do want to use a 400 speed film, Kodak Ultra 400 is worth considering because of its great latitude and low graininess.

    Best,
    Helen

  10. #10
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    Both mrcallow and Helen have excellent suggestions. In the situation as you describe it, color negative may be the better choice. However, you should take a roll or two of color transparency film, I recommend Fuji Provia F400. There are times when the higher contrast is desired.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

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