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  1. #1
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Process EM-25 - What is it?

    I got a Super8 camera today, and it has a film cartrige in in. The cartrige is labeled "3M Color Movie, ISO 40, Process EM-25".

    I have never heard of this process (didn't even know that 3M made film ...)

    I'm assuming that it's one of the "E" processes, though I don't really know. Does anybody have any info.?

  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    It is probably a 3M E3 or E4 workalike process.

    3M once made lots of film here in Rochester and at their plant in Minnesota. They also bought Ferrania and got much material from them, particulary color.

    PE

  3. #3
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Ok, I thought so. It is good to know that it's something at least standard (though old).

    I have NO IDEA as to the workings of either E-3 or E-4; is it possible to process this manually (either with the correct chems. or perhaps in a modified E-6 / C-41 process)? I'm not necessarily looking for quality; I just want to get some images off of this.

    Ideas anyone?

  4. #4
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    No, the E3 and E4 films were very low in hardness. They required 75 deg F processing or a prehardener and use at 85 deg F. The VNF process on the Kodak web site has the formulations of the solutions and the process sequence of what I suspect to be the correct process. Just a guess.

    PE

  5. #5
    dschneller's Avatar
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    Did a little search for you on the net so take the qoute for what it is, this is what one person had to say.

    [font=verdana]Process EM-25 was the final process for non-prehardened movie
    films, and an interim process, just before EM-26 came out. It was only
    made for a short time period, and it more similar to the E-6 process
    colorwise, but the film still had to be run thru Pre-Hardner and then
    Neutralizer and a rinse, prior to being in development.[/font]
    Rocky Mountain Film processes old film and has an explaination of EM-25

  6. #6

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    The formulas for the E-3 and E-4 processes were given in the Dignan Newsletter. The Newsletter is available on microfiche through major libraries.

  7. #7
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    I'm not so sure about VNF - although Kodak have now discontinued all chemicals and film material on environmental grounds.

    I know somone who would offer an opinion - Ludwig Draser who runs Andec Filmtechnik in Berlin. They are a professional motion picture lab and could probably process it - if it is worth it.

    http://www.andecfilm.de/html/start_english.htm

    Someone who would also know is:

    John P. Pytlak,
    Senior Technical Specialist
    EI Customer Technical Services, Research Labs, Bldg.69
    Eastman Kodak Company
    Rochester, New York 14650-1922 USA
    Tel: +1 585 477 5325 Cell: +1 585 781 4036
    e-mail: john.pytlak@kodak.com

    He is very helpful. If you email him he will almost certainly get back to you with an answer.

    Matt

  8. #8

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    If you want to get this film processed, I recommend you get in touch with Martin Baumgarten in Plattsburgh, New York. His email is Super8mm@[spambots are everywhere]aol.com Remove the obvious addition. He also has a site on AOL that describes the prices for the services he offers. He is the BEST for scratchless, high-quality film processing. I forget the URL, but if you were to do a search for "Plattsburgh Photographic Services" the link would pop up. Hope this helps.

    Regards.

    Karl Borowski

  9. #9
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Thanks for the suggestions; if I need film that's odd processed well, I'll DEFINETELY look these people up.

    I probably didn't make it clear (my fault), that I don't need this proffessiopnally processed; it's film form the 1970s - 1980s ish with about 10 feet of somebody's home movies + some stuff that I've shot around home just for testing. I'm really looking for a way to process it myself (preferably in color). Does anyone have any ideas on MANUALLY processing it?

    Dschneller - where did you find that info on the process? - it seems useful ...

  10. #10
    dschneller's Avatar
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    It's from the same gentleman that FilmIs4Ever suggested. He posted the information on usenet in[font=verdana] [/font][font=verdana]a[/font]lt.movies.cinematography.super8, his website is:[font=verdana]http://members.aol.com/Super8mm/Super8mm.html. He also
    recommends visiting KODAK's New Super 8 dedicated site
    http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/super8/

    Dave
    [/font]

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