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Thread: Lookin' old...

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    Lookin' old...

    Which color film in your opinion (chrome or print) films
    looks most "retro", if you know what I mean?

    Now I don't mean in terms of grain and image quality, but in terms of
    "vintage" looking tones

    Kodachrome doesn't count

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    Maybe some Fuji negs like NPS160 with some light amber filter? To me, AGFA RSX50 was the most retro-looking one, but where it is today?

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    I never used the AGFA you mentioned..

    My opinion is Ektachrome 100, 64/64T, 160T
    These look very 80's to me.

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    Polite request: The 80s aren't vintage yet. Some of us don't really need to feel that old today.

    On a more serious note, if I use old NG and a few family slides as models, then maybe try pushing Astia + adding a warming filter?

    As I posted in another thread, Kodak claims that the 160T is the same film as the 1980s version. The Ektrachrome 64 probably is as well. Add a slight warming filter to counteract the old Ektachrome blue, and you might get a look similar to old Kodachrome.

    The Agfa was nice stuff; very life-like, very restrained palette. Sic transit gloria mundi.

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    I have a few ideas how to do it with any film.

    I would recommend stressing the film, leave it in the hot hot car.

    Also, use old uncoated optics, that tends to do something strange.

    Also, having he control to change color balance yourself will help a great deal.

    Or use a light sepia filter.

    Just a few ideas,

    Corey

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    Quote Originally Posted by fparnold
    Polite request: The 80s aren't vintage yet. Some of us don't really need to feel that old today.

    On a more serious note, if I use old NG and a few family slides as models, then maybe try pushing Astia + adding a warming filter?

    As I posted in another thread, Kodak claims that the 160T is the same film as the 1980s version. The Ektrachrome 64 probably is as well. Add a slight warming filter to counteract the old Ektachrome blue, and you might get a look similar to old Kodachrome.

    The Agfa was nice stuff; very life-like, very restrained palette. Sic transit gloria mundi.

    Well, I know 80's aren't old (hey I lived in 80's too), but films before the 90's generation still had a more vintage look.

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    Quote Originally Posted by boyooso
    I have a few ideas how to do it with any film.

    I would recommend stressing the film, leave it in the hot hot car.

    Also, use old uncoated optics, that tends to do something strange.

    Also, having he control to change color balance yourself will help a great deal.

    Or use a light sepia filter.

    Just a few ideas,

    Corey
    well that's what you'd do to make the film look faded a bit. But
    in every decade, when films were newly processed, they looked
    quite neutral and clean.

    From what I hear (and it makes sense), the difference is that
    modern films have that linear straight part of the curve much longer,
    so when you expose you can put almost your entire printable image on the straight part of the curve, which makes the image look linear and smooth.
    The old films had the toe and sholder longer, and the linear part was much shorter, so the shadows and highlights were somewhat distorted in an interesting way, which now looks "retro" to us.
    Same goes for slide films.

    The most noticable effects of this is how the blacks quicky faded to black.
    Modern films have smooth gradations in shadows that slowly fade to black, while older films, just give you cartoon-like blobs of black.
    Same goes for highlights. Modern highlights look more like video, they burn out in a linear way, and with older films they get compressed more and more as they go to white, which again gives you pleasant warm white blobs.
    Best example is comparing backlit images now and then.

    When you try to remodel the curve in photoshop all you get is a change in contrast. Instead of twisting an existing curve, you are supose to have the light being recorded on an already twisted curve, which I don't think you can do in photoshop. But there must be a way if you start out with some kind of a low contrast raw scan of the negative. I just didn't see anyone figure it out yet

  8. #8
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed_Davor
    well that's what you'd do to make the film look faded a bit. But
    in every decade, when films were newly processed, they looked
    quite neutral and clean.
    I object. ORWOcolor never looked neutral - or clean.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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    permit me an ackham's razor.

    I'd say don't focus on the film, so to speak. Get an old uncoated or single-coated folder camera and shoot with that. I think as much or more than anything, the "old look" was a product of the lenses rather than the film.

    also, if you need to use flash, try using flashbulbs.

    -KwM-

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    Reply to "Lookin' old"

    You can make colour prints look slightly dated. In the early 1950's Agfacolor paper, amongst other colour papers, was being used in the UK. The greens in the Agfacolor paper at that time faded first leaving a magenta/red image.I have some Agfacolor prints dated from around 1953 and the green dye in them is now very weak, even non existant in some prints. To get this old Agfacolor look, I made a print on slightly uotdated Fujicolor Type MP Crystal Archive paper (RA4 process). When Fujicolor paper is old, it has a "crossover",i.e. magenta highlights,green shadows. Keep your negative on the "soft" side,or maybe photograph on a dull day, and then print on slightly outdated Fuji paper, as above, normal processing in RA4 , or even cut the dev. time a bit, and filter the print with a slightly magenta/red cast.The trick is to get paper of the "right age", and not to overdo the magenta cast. These old Agfacolor prints of mine have been "Dark stored", and the density of them has'nt suffered, but they all have a varying red/magenta cast.
    Very old Fujicolor paper is almost impossible to print on, I have some FA4 paper,which comes up with a magenta image that I cannot filter out. The border whites are almost bright magenta! All Agfacolor papers made pre 1972 were on a "paper" base. This is not available now but a semi-matt surface might give the nearest effect on resin coated. I have some unexposed Agfacolor paper manufactured around 1964. I wonder how that would look if I tried to print on it now! Best of luck. I hope you get the effect you are looking for. MT

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