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  1. #1

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    Tungsten film Kodak

    I am going to use tungsten film on my Bronica EC TL for the first time. Can a flash be used ? I suppose not. I want to use it indoors but there is a large window which is projecting daylight to the inside of our living room. I want to photograph my kids. Any useful website ?

  2. #2
    Helen B's Avatar
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    I use tungsten film (Portra 100T) with flash, but put a piece of full CTO (‘colour temperature orange’, daylight to tungsten lighting gel) over the flash. If I’m using faster tungsten film (Ektachrome 320T/EPJ or Eastman Vision2 Expression 500T/5229 – both 35 mm only) I don’t use flash.

    If you have sunlight streaming through the window, that would look blue, of course. One answer, if that is not what you want to happen, is to cover the windows in CTO, perhaps with ND as well. Might you be better off using daylight film (and maybe reflectors) in this case?

    Best,
    Helen

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Helen--have you shot 5229 (or other Vision 2 films) as a still film? Who processes it that way, and where do you get it? Any scans you might care to post?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4

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    I think Helen is on to something... sunlight streaming into the window + flash, or either individually, is a job for daylight-balanced film rather than tungsten-balanced film.

  5. #5
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Get an 85B Wratten filter for your camera. This shifts the balance from 5500K to 3200K, with only a 2/3 stop speed penalty. Then you can shoot with flash to your heart's content.

    I use only Ektachrome 64T (EPY) because I find it so much superior to any daylight color film. Neither the 160T E-6 nor Portra 100T comes anywhere near it in terms of scale or color balance.

  6. #6
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Hi David,

    You can get short ends for 14¢ per foot from the Film Emporium on the 4th floor of 274 Madison Ave - (212) 683-2433. Just ask for 100 ft or less if you are using a bulk loader. The cores used for movie film fit bulk loaders. There are some sloppy camera assistants around, and it shows in how badly they unload short ends. If you just want a couple of cassettes for testing, PM me with a delivery address and I'll send them.

    Dale in Hollywood Fla. still process for $4 or process and print for $12, plus postage. They don't supply the film any more though.

    I'll see if I can find some snaps suitable for publication on the web.

    c6h603,
    I'm a bit surprised that you find 64T to have a longer scale than 100T - I find the opposite, and with a neg film colour balance is all down to how it is printed.

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Thanks, Helen.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    c6h603,
    I'm a bit surprised that you find 64T to have a longer scale than 100T - I find the opposite, and with a neg film colour balance is all down to how it is printed.

    Best,
    Helen
    Helen,
    Pro 100T had the longest scale of any film I've ever used, color or black and white. But when they replaced it with Portra 100T I stopped using tungsten C-41 films altogether. I found Portra 100T harsh, contrasty and with sick making color balance. But you know, as much as Kodak changes things without telling us I should probably give it another try. Maybe I'll be pleasantly surprised.

    Another good film is the Fuji 64T. I'm very anxious to try the new one. The old one's not as good as EPY, but almost.

    Regards to All

  9. #9

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    I'm considering entering into ECN-2/ECP-2 processing. Not only are the Vision2 films great all-around films (and they're much newer emulsion technology than the current Portra series), but they're also great ways of testing out movie stocks for cinematographers. I know several cinematographers that are looking for this type of processing. How many of you still photographers out there are using it too?

    Helen: How do you print ECN-2 film onto RA-4 paper? Do you just get slide prints made onto Vision print film, or do you scan and print or do something else? I've heard that, since it's balanced for printing onto another piece of film, it is subject to weird color crossover in the shadows.

    Regards.

    Karl Borowski



 

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