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  1. #11
    Samuel B's Avatar
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    Don't know if this helps, but I have been working my way through some Fuji Sensia slide film, expired 06 / 2005, hasn't been refrigerated. The results have been fine, although I haven't used this film before so I have nothing to compare them to. So I would say the Astia, if it's been kept cold should be fine.

  2. #12

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    I've been using out of date color film, especially sheet film, quite a bit. Usually, it works just fine. Even when a couple of years out of date, film that has been kept cold seems to work OK. But there is no guarantee of satisfaction. I'm sure small discrepacies in color and speed creep in as the film ages. In one case I got an ugly magenta blotch in the middle of an otherwise nice 8X10 Ektachrome (and it wasn't because of bad processing). In another, some Agfa Optima became nearly unprintable because of shifts.

  3. #13
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    I've often used colour print film that's up to 3 years old without problems but the risk increases the older it is. Black & white film remains useable for much longer as long as it hasn't been stored in damp conditions or exposed to high temperature or high humidity. Ten years past expiry date is usually fine and I've often read on here of people who have used film much older than that. There can be an increase in base fog and a slight loss of speed and generally slow and medium speed films are less prone to these changes.

  4. #14

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    Back in 1992, I found 3 rolls of exposed Tri-X that I had shot 15 YEARS before during a particularily long and lost weekend in San Diego, Calif. Upon developing the film, I was reminded what had gone on for those three sweltering summer days in 1977! As Aunt Harriet would say, "Oh, my land!" The negs looked pretty good (about 1 stop overexposed) and the resulting 11x14s showed rather more grain than I prefer (ok, golf-ball sized grain) but was otherwise passable. Interestingly enough, I have just this week, purchased 18 rolls of Tri-X 36 exp. with a 1977 expiration date (for sentimental reasons). I may shoot a couple of rolls through one of my OM-2 cameras and see how big the grain is with 28 year old film!

    Generally speaking though, I've avoided using expired, off-brand, or discount films as long as I can afford to buy first quality materials. Of course, with the major changes going on in the photography world I may well change my point of view on a number of issues.

    SatinSnow,
    You forgot to tell us your address and the specific days that you'll be away on vacation!
    "A certain amount of contempt for the material employed to express an idea is indispensable to the purest realization of this idea." Man Ray

  5. #15

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    I recently bought a few rolls of Kodachrome 64 dated 1991 for next to nothing. I shot a test roll which came back indistinguishable from current stock. I've no idea how it had previously been stored, and of course Kodachrome is probably about the most stable transparency film in many respects, but two shots from my test roll are now with a magazine editor who apparently intends to publish them.

    Steve

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Roberts
    I recently bought a few rolls of Kodachrome 64 dated 1991 for next to nothing. I shot a test roll which came back indistinguishable from current stock. I've no idea how it had previously been stored, and of course Kodachrome is probably about the most stable transparency film in many respects, but two shots from my test roll are now with a magazine editor who apparently intends to publish them.
    That's great to hear. I have spent the last 2 years buying up 2002 / 2003 KM-25 rolls for a documentary, have about 70 rolls ( you don't wan't to know how much that cost! ). All said to be frozen.

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