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  1. #1
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
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    Slide processing - book recommendation(s)

    Hello folks!

    I need help with book recommendations - what is a good book to learn color slide processing from? I am currently shooting 135 & 120 color slides (Velvia 50) and the lab I used has stopped processing 120 films. Sending film out or going to NYC is a hassle. I would like to learn slide processing and if it's not too complicated, do my own processing. Please bear in mind that I have never developed my own films, but am planning to start soon!

    A quick forum search on this question did not turn up any results. Any advice/suggestions/recommendations will be much appreciated.


    Best,


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    BTW start with B&W negatives. Learn to load film and handle chemicals. Once you've got those basic skills down then move on to E-6.

  4. #4
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    BTW start with B&W negatives. Learn to load film and handle chemicals. Once you've got those basic skills down then move on to E-6.
    Thank you for the suggestion. I was going to start with B&W and then move to E-6. I have some books that cover B&W processing, but none that deals with E-6 processing, hence the question.

    Regards,


  5. #5
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    I can't say, other than the product data sheets that the various companies publish, that I have ever seen a book dedicated to E6 processing, I have an extensive collection of books and many on darkroom and processing, and other than a few small blurbs, there really is not much dedicated to the E6 process in any of them.

    Dave

  6. #6

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    Sanjay, the basic techniques are the same, though E-6 is much less forgiving of timing errors and requires absolute temperature control. I don't know of any books explicity about colour developing, but the information sheets that come with E-6 kits usually have all the info you could need.

  7. #7
    roteague's Avatar
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    Good suggestions, or just send your film to Calypso (http://www.calypsoinc.com/). Their prices are great and turnaround fast.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    There aren't many creative options with E-6 processing in general, so there isn't as much reason for there to be a popular book on the subject, though I'm sure there are some very technical books on E-6. Just get one of the kits, and follow the directions carefully. With B&W you can experiment more, because you don't have to worry about color shifts.

    As the others suggest, start with B&W just to get used to handling film, agitation, and the basics.

    For E-6, I've had good results with the Tetenal 3-bath kit, which is convenient for normal processing and one-stop push processing with Kodak and Fuji films. I recommend using it one-shot for push processing, or reusing only once for normal processing, although they give instructions for running three batches through one set of working solutions.

    For more control or greater than one stop push, the Kodak and Tetenal 6-bath kits are better.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  9. #9
    Baxter Bradford's Avatar
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    I agree with David, the instructions in the chemical kit should be fine and also there are pdfs on the Jobo website which are helpful.

    Also concur that E6 ought not be the first development process which you experience. The Jobo machines can make life much easier and are available used, from auction sites or dealers making a big saving over the retail price. The ATL Jobo machines are even better since they run the process of your choice automatically. They are correspondingly dearer though.

    Robert's advice of finding a commercial processor with good quality makes sense if you are not going to be processing large amounts.

    Personally the ability to push/pull individual sheets of 5x4 without having to spend half a day going to the lab clinched the decision to home process. If you are using bracketing then this need is negated and commercial may well be more convenient.

  10. #10
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Another option for home processing that is really pretty inexpensive if you find a good used machine is the Phototherm Sidekick, I have one and it works great for B&W, C41 and E6, they can be had for about $300.00 Plus or Minus on Ebay, often times they will be machines that have been retired from photo stores, Phototherm is a very easy company to work with and great people.

    Dave

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