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Thread: E6 at Home

  1. #11
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    I use the Unicolor Rapid E-6 kits. They are available in either 3 or 6 step varieties (at the moment, I'm using the 3 step). They sell via ebay (buy it now) or direct from Photo Systems Inc. Since I'm not a high volume user, I tend to just buy a quart kit and mix what I need.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  2. #12
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Thought I'd mention something to you guys...

    I'm thinking of selling almost all my gaming stuff (my beloved Nintendo 64, my Playstation games, my Gameboy Micro, and my PS2 with games) plus the action figures I looked very, very hard for (the McFarlane Metal Gear Solid 2 figures - all of them) to finance a CPE-2 processor. I think I'd miss a lot of the stuff...but I really should focus on my photography. I look at it this way: once I start really concentrating on photography and I start selling prints, I can buy it all back.

    Good idea? I think so. B&W film will still be done by hand because I have certain agitation techniques that I use that the Jobo isn't quite good for. Judging, though, from how hard it is to get E6 done around here at all and C-41 done beyond mediocre, it seems like it would be a godsend.

  3. #13

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    Steph: I can't comment on the Jobo, but as I indicated over on RFF, my experience with E-6 (Tetenal 3-solution) in regular stainless steel gear/water bath was great. I just centred myself, made sure I was focused on al the variables (temp, times, etc.) and got the job done. Beautiful chromes emerged, and the only reason to go with lab work was convenience. But you don't have local convenience, so do your own, I know you will be successful.

    If you are going to get the Jobo later, just shoot a test roll and process it manually with the gear you have for proof of concept.

    Earl
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

  4. #14
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The image you get from second party kits may look good but you have to look at color fidelity, grain and sharpness for starters, and then in the long run current E6 films use a proprietary dye stabilizer that must be accounted for.

    So, you may not see defects unless you look carefully at comparison images or compare them as a function of keeping.

    In addition, the push/pull characteristics of second party kits may not be the same as the Kodak and Fuji products.

    Please be aware of this.

    PE

  5. #15

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    FWIW, my experience was quite some time ago (mid-80s), so PE's input is valuable. Plus, most of my home processing was with Agfachrome, plus a bit of Ektachrome.

    My main conclusions were that with the Tetenal kit of the era, temperature control was achievable under my conditions, and that the chromes, under careful examination with a loupe, looked comparable to custom lab-processed slides.
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

  6. #16
    kaiyen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim
    I look at it this way: once I start really concentrating on photography and I start selling prints, I can buy it all back.
    My only comment - this might not be the _most_ sound approach to long-term planning. A lot of people I know concentrate pretty hard on their photography and don't sell any prints.

    allan

  7. #17
    Petzi's Avatar
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    The Jobo kits are actually made by Fuji Hunt, at least the ones sold in Europe. I don't know if they are sold in the USA; but I guess if they are, then they are probably not different from ours.

  8. #18
    davetravis's Avatar
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    Thought I'd mention something to you guys...
    Stephanie,
    Doesn't sound weird at all to me!
    I financed my first color darkroom, by selling my first medium format camera system!
    I already had enough negs, but nothing to print them with.
    Later on down the road, I bought another 6x7 system that worked even better for me than the first.
    It's all about trade-offs.
    Good luck, and don't loose any sleep over what you let go.

  9. #19
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim
    I have about 20 rolls of E6 film that I want to have processed, but no processing facilities around here. Thought about just doing it myself. What kits would you recommend? How hard is it to keep everything the right temperature in a water bath? How bad *are* the chemicals? I know to wear gloves, but are there any other precautions I should take?

    Just want to know from people who've done it.

    And by the way, I was thinking of using the Photocolor 3 bath kits from B&H. Good idea or bad idea?
    Stephanie,

    I wouldn't reccomend processing E-6 for the sake of improving your photography. Processing e-6 is relatively easy but no one has mentioned mounting the slides if that is your goal. Slide mounting is a very tedious and boring job (along with most aspects of darkroom work.) After all of the time spent processing and mounting you would be better off using a good processing lab via mail if you have too.

    You might check with your local retail film processing centers and find out what labs do their slide processing and deal with the lab directly. Shoot a test roll and submit it for processing. More than likely they will do a decent job since the lab is geared up for it.

    OTOH, if you want to purchase a Jobo for B&W development your money will be well spent.
    Don Bryant

  10. #20
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    Stephanie,

    Nice to see another Iowan on APUG. What part of Iowa do you live in? I shoot E6 all the time, most of the time mail it to E6 LAB of Atlanta. They do a great job and usually have it back to me in 4 days or less. They can do 4x5, 70mm, 120 or 35mm.

    Jamie
    Keep Film Alive, Shoot Everyday!
    JamiesInfraredPhotography.com

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