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  1. #1

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    printing positives at home.

    Hello everyone,

    I have a colour darkroom at home. It consists of the darkroom itself. A durst enlarger, and a big developing machine, for the paper.
    the negatives I bring to a lab, to get them back alltogether with a contact sheet. I was told at my school, that the development of c41 is not so critical as B/W, so leaving it to the lab was OK.

    I was wondering, since I do all this with negatives very nicely. Why can't I do this with positives, dia slides?
    I can imagine one uses different paper and chemicals, but that would be all I can think off. Am I right?
    the machine I use, is a big 6 bath machine, with digital temperature control and speed control for every bath.
    What process should I use, and is it easy?
    if so, then I might be switching to slides for landscapes.


    Hope to hear something about this. I searched APUG on this but could not find the answer, so here 's the thread....

    Best regards Sam

  2. #2
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    The correct way to do this would be with a slide - printing (positive) process, such as Cibachrome (Ilfochrome, Now). I believe that Kodak also makes a paper for this.

    It's probably also possible to reversal process RA-4 paper, though you'd need to compensate for the blue tone of the paper that compensates for the C-41 orange mask. That would be a bit of a hack method though ...

  3. #3

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    I think Ilford is all that's left. The documents used to be on the Ilford website. I'd start by looking there.

    Easy? Don't know I do RA-4. But I've never heard anybody call Ilfochrome easy.

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    I'll check on illfords website.
    I'd say Ra 4 is easy, and since I imagine the infochrome process as quite similar except for the actual chemicals and paper, then I'll think of ilfochrome as quite easy as well.
    Zentena, indeed I never hear people call it easy... Instead I hear people rave about the difficulties. "Slides are impossible to do yourself" I was wondering where all of that comes from.
    Well, If anyone can think of more realted stuff I'll be happy to hear it, for now all the best - Sam

  5. #5

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    ILFOCHROME CLASSIC PROCESS P3. This 3-bath process is designed both for the professional lab, amateurs and enthusiasts. Various options are available.
    KIT3.5 replaces P30P and is designed to be used in small tabletop processors such as CAP40, ICP/IWD 42 or with drum processing.

    Well, when using this with ilfochrome, you have a working slides lab.....
    I'll contact my deliverer about availability. If indeed things are working like they should, I'll have to reconsider my move to negative film again.... But that is for the near future.
    In the mean while I again love to hear why no one is doing slides in their darkrooms, and why all the people I talk to are so damn negative about positives in a darkroom

    Best regards Sam

  6. #6

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    I'm probably one of the few who for colour only does Ilfochrome and not RA4. I still print B&W negatives. Ilfochrome is not a difficult process by itself and the difficulties often mentioned are associated with contrast control and colour crossover. It is also somewhat more expensive than RA4. I would recommend you start with the P30/P3.5 kit. If you get the bug you can use a modified B&W developer, the P3 bleach and B&W fixer which gives you a small amount of contrast control which may avoid the need for a contrast reduction mask. Be aware that the Ilfochrome bleach should not be used in some automated print processors.

    Roger.

  7. #7

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    Because I have a difficult time finding Ilfochrome materials, in my market, I used a slide copier to make internegatives with standard ASA 100 color film. Kodak no longer makes a true internegative film but I used rebanded Afga and I plan to try Kodak and Fuji in the next couple of weeks. The Afga seems to shift towards red, but without test equipment I don't have any way to really know, the contrast seems ok and I was able to color correct with the filter pack (color head). The slide duplicator I use is a basic unit that is used with natural sunlight, I can crop but I have not yet cropped yet so I don't what the outside limits of a crop will be.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I think Ilford is all that's left. The documents used to be on the Ilford website. I'd start by looking there.

    Easy? Don't know I do RA-4. But I've never heard anybody call Ilfochrome easy.
    I used to process Cibachrome in a Jobo machine, and I found it fairly easy.

    As far as I know, all other color reversal processes have been discontinued.

    Cibachrome processors (roller transport) are not that hard to find nor are they expensive. That should make life easy if you are serious about printing slides.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by game
    the machine I use, is a big 6 bath machine, with digital temperature control and speed control for every bath.
    Who made the machine? Which model is it?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Petzi
    Who made the machine? Which model is it?
    it's the metoform 7060 or 6070. It's made by meteor. Which is german if I remember correctly. It's discontinued and quite obscure actually, but all spare parts are still available. How do I find out if this machine can deal with cibachrome chemicals? Never found any warnings or whatever in the manual.

    Best regards Sam.

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