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  1. #1

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    Newbie/final project

    Hey guys, i'm currently working on my final project (I'm a photography sophomore). I'm planning to shoot an abandoned children's home for my final project. I'm going to use a 4x5 and i plan to print on warm tone glossy #2 fiber based paper. I believe it will be 11x16 format paper. I want to get my paper to match the feeling of the setting i plan to present. That is, the feeling of abandonment, decayment, and timelessness. One of my ideas was to try to crumple up the paper to create a "used" look. The only concern i have is light hitting the paper during the process. I was wondering if you guys had any ideas on how the create the feeling i'm looking for. Also, any ideas for creating the same effect on the matboard frame? P.S. i don't have access to very many chemicals.
    thanks andrew

  2. #2
    roteague's Avatar
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    hotami, it looks like you have a good idea. I'm not sure about "crumpling" up the paper; it sounds like a gimmick. I think you would be better off using the image to convey the meaning you are trying to impart. There are a number of processes you could use that would give you that feeling. Best of luck, I would like to see how your results turn out.

    BTW, you might ask a moderator to move this thread - you posted it in the "color" section, and obviously you want "black and white".
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #3
    agGNOME's Avatar
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    I'd be inclined to keep the paper flat during processing, but don't let that stop you from experimenting. Maybe process, then crumple, then set to dry. The first thoughts that pop into mind are: If you are set on the paper and chemicals you are using then introduce materials such as "saran wrap" crumpled and stretched over the printing paper. Stockings with large holes stretched over the paper; this could create irregular patterns and diffused areas. You can also stretch materials over the enlarging lens. Experiment toning the prints in coffee or tea. Burn (literally) some of the edges of the paper irregularly. Scratch your negs. Now if you could use liquid emulsion the possibilities are limitless. Welcome to Apug and good luck.

  4. #4
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    Hotami, in a book by Michael Langford I've seen an example of a picture made on crumbled paper which was very interesting, but not made as you thought to make it (crumbling paper after process).

    The paper was crumbled, then folded out but put under the enlarger's light when it was somewhat still unstable (moving and expanding) and then processed.

    The results were amazing as some areas had a "shaking" effect, as if the buildings on it were to fall down, while areas having had different exposures due to the different angle they presented to incoming light showed some sort of "mosaic" or "broken glass" effect.

    The idea of phisically burning edges proposed be agGNOME sounds interesting as well.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  5. #5
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    I tend to agree with the previous poster that crumpling the paper might look somewhat contrived. It sounds to me like you are going for the "old photo" look. Have you thought about using a pinhole camera or cheap Holga camera, or perhaps a Lensbaby? These options, in combination with your warm paper choice and perhaps the coffee/tea/whatever staining mentioned earlier might impart the look you are after.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  6. #6

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    I accidentally discovered that Svema FN64 (a Ukrainian film) developed in XTOL produces huge grain, uneven image tone, and occasional odd splotches. Overall, it conveys a very old look, particularly if you underdevelop a bit. Here's an example shot. (The same film in Rodinal or PC-Glycol is much more conventional.) Ordinarily this effect is to be avoided, but it might be worth trying for your project. OTOH, I used 35mm film, I don't know if this film is made in larger formats, and even if it is I'd expect the effect I'm describing would be less pronounced in larger formats. As a practical matter, Svema film doesn't exactly have good worldwide distribution, so you'll probably have a hard time finding it outside of Eastern Europe. If you don't need to start immediately but want to experiment, try contacting the eBay seller "alex-photo." He's got some 8mm Svema movie film up for auction right now, and IIRC I bought my Svema film from him; he might be able to get some for you, but shipping is likely to take 2-4 weeks.

  7. #7
    blaze-on's Avatar
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    You might get some ideas or inspiration from one of APUG's own - Gandolfi.

    He hasn't tuned in for some time but here's his gallery link.
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showgall...00&ppuser=4887

    Scratched negs, paper, etc...
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

  8. #8

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    hi andrew

    you might also look at gandolfi's article on how to "kill your darlings"
    its right here: http://www.apug.org/forums/article.php?a=129 .


    sounds like a fun project -

    good luck

    -john

  9. #9

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    How about using liquid light on a piece of white cloth and projecting the images on it? You can use canvas material, too, and you can brush it later if you want to.

  10. #10
    Valerie's Avatar
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    try very thin tissue paper, crumpled then smoothed out (still has wrinkles in it), over your paper during a few seconds of the exposure. gives a nice, aged effect
    "So I am turning over a new leaf but the page is stuck". Diane Arbus



 

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