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  1. #1
    BradS's Avatar
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    Processing C-41 at home?

    In another thread, somebody suggested that it wasn't too difficult to process C-41 at home. At first, I thought they must be teasing me (which is fine) but, then I thought maybe not....

    So, what's involved?

    Any suggestions about where to read up on the details of the preocess?


    TIA,

    Brad.

  2. #2

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    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/servi...als/z131.shtml

    Likely more info then you need.

    Basically it's not much different then B&W. You need tighter temperture control. But thats mostly at the developer step which is fairly short.

  3. #3
    BradS's Avatar
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    DOH!

    Thanks.


    Brad (Can I get another do-nut?)

  4. #4
    BradS's Avatar
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    Geez, they even have instructions for processing Kodachrome here.

  5. #5

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    The simplest way to get started is probably to buy a "kit" of chemicals. Tetenal and others sell these through the usual outlets (B&H, Adorama, Freestyle, etc.), although choice at any one dealer tends to be a bit limited. The kits have a few advantages: They come with complete but not over-complete instructions, so you're less likely to get confused; they come in small enough quantities that you won't throw out a lot if you're a low-volume user; and they're often a bit simpler than the chemistry offered by Kodak (most notably, the kits usually combine the bleach and fix steps into a single blix step, and they sometimes omit the stabilizer). The last of these may be a disadvantage in terms of the quality of the results, though; blixes have a tendency to leave behind a bit more silver than do the separate steps. Stabilizer seems to be a complex topic; it may or may not be necessary, and I've yet to see a simple statement from anybody whose judgment I trust concerning when it is necessary for image stability. Still, for just "getting your feet wet," a kit can be a good way to get started. Once you're more familiar with the process, you can switch to the Kodak, Fuji, or whatever chemicals sold for labs, if you like.

  6. #6

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    Even if you want to mix your own it's not hard, comparable to mixing a B&W developer.

    C-41 Developer (Official)
    Water (50° C) ........................... 800 ml
    Potassium carbonate (anhy) ........ 37.5 g
    Sodium sulfite (anhy) ................. 4.3 g
    Potassium iodide ....................... 0.002 g
    Sodium bromide ......................... 1.3 g
    Hydroxylamine sulfate ................. 2.0 g
    Kodak Anti-Cal #3 ...................... 2.5 g
    CD-4 ....................................... 4.8 g
    Water to make .......................... 1.0 l

    pH 10.00 +/- 0.03

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Koch
    Even if you want to mix your own it's not hard, comparable to mixing a B&W developer.

    C-41 Developer (Official)
    Water (50° C) ........................... 800 ml
    Potassium carbonate (anhy) ........ 37.5 g
    Sodium sulfite (anhy) ................. 4.3 g
    Potassium iodide ....................... 0.002 g
    Sodium bromide ......................... 1.3 g
    Hydroxylamine sulfate ................. 2.0 g
    Kodak Anti-Cal #3 ...................... 2.5 g
    CD-4 ....................................... 4.8 g
    Water to make .......................... 1.0 l

    pH 10.00 +/- 0.03
    What's Kodak Anti-Cal #3?
    Is that a water softener like (say) Calgon (Sodium HexaMetaPhosphate)?

    Do you have official formulae for C-41 seperate bleach and fixer as well?

  8. #8

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    http://www.bonavolta.ch/hobby/en/pho..._chemicals.htm

    Not sure it makes much sense to make fix.

  9. #9

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    is it also possible to make chemicals for printing rather easily? like ra4 process?
    Not that I am going to, but the thought is comfortable.
    Best regards Sam

  10. #10

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    The stabiliser step is the easiest of the lot - comparable to the 'washaid' step when processing B&W. Don't do this with the film on the reel.

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