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Thread: C41 PUSH?

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    C41 PUSH?

    How does C41 work? Is the process to develop 400 and 200 different? If I have shoot the 200 film at EI200, and want to develop at 400, do I need to tell them? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Most shops do not offer C41 push processing, there are a couple, but it is not common, none of the one hour labs do it, at least I have not run into any. I am a bit confused, why would you want to shoot 200 film at 200 and then develop like it was 400? any of the automatic processing machines like you find in the 1 hour labs, develop all of the C41 the same way, no variance in the amount of time in the machine.

    Also a push would be if you actually shoot ISO 200 film at ISO 400 and a pull would be if you actually shoot 200 at 100, push is actually shot at a faster ISO than the film rating and pull is if you actully shoot at a lower ISO than the film rating.

    Dave

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    You tell them it needs a one stop push. They then develop for 30 seconds longer then normal. I think one stop is 30 seconds. Of course this assumes they can.

    All C-41 film given normal development gets the same time in the developer. ISO doesn't matter.

    BTW I'm assuming you mean shooting 200 film at 400? Not sure why you'd want to shoot it at 200 and then develop for a 400 exposure.

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    metod's Avatar
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    In my opinion, you would be disappointed if C-41 film is pushed too much. Its true that color film is quite forgiving in over or under exposure, but you would rather opt for over exposure as it brings out more saturation. What I used to do if extra speed needed, I bought ISO 800 film, rated it at 600 with nice results.

    Metod

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    Thanks a lot for your answers.

    The reason I ask is I didn't know how the C-41 process work, or how the one-hour photo work. I have a single used camera designed to use 400 film. I took it apart and load a roll of 200 to test to see the result.

    Also, I am curious how the over/under, push/pull processes would affect the color in the film. I don't really want to color to be faithful, nor dramtic. I want this kind of result http://www.magnumphotos.com/c/htm/CD...E=2S5RYDIQA5G8

    Also, Metod, to bring out more saturation, I can over expose the film? I can shoot the 400 film as 200 and develop as normal, right?

    Thanks.

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    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Dx,

    The single use camera is set up with a fixed f-stop and there is no adjustments to vary shutter speed or exposure, those cameras are not designed for any particular speed of film, the reason you see 400 or 800 in all of them is to give the maximum amout of success possible for the snap shooter, because print films have such exposure lattitude, most of the time you will get good shots, but again, if you put 200 in it, its not going to vary the exposure based on the fact it orginally had 400 in it. Based on it being a single use that was optimized for 400 speed, your probably going to end up with thin negatives.

    Dave

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    Quote Originally Posted by dxphoto
    Thanks a lot for your answers.

    The reason I ask is I didn't know how the C-41 process work, or how the one-hour photo work. I have a single used camera designed to use 400 film. I took it apart and load a roll of 200 to test to see the result.

    Also, I am curious how the over/under, push/pull processes would affect the color in the film. I don't really want to color to be faithful, nor dramtic. I want this kind of result http://www.magnumphotos.com/c/htm/CD...E=2S5RYDIQA5G8

    Also, Metod, to bring out more saturation, I can over expose the film? I can shoot the 400 film as 200 and develop as normal, right?

    Thanks.
    And this is beyond the single use cameras. How should I do it with regular cameras.

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    metod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dxphoto
    Also, Metod, to bring out more saturation, I can over expose the film? I can shoot the 400 film as 200 and develop as normal, right?

    Thanks.
    Yes, one stop overexposure is still OK. Usually, when you overexpose color film slightly, you get better saturation and colors just pop up. The grain tends to diminish slightly as well. This might not always work well, say you taking portraits. There is nothing worse than getting back pictures from uderexposed color film= no color and they are very flat.

    As for the picture you sent the link to, that would be hard to achieve without you being at the last stage of the color control. At the lab they have these machines calibrated so they portray the reality as much as possible. Unless, perhaps if you ask them for the effect you are looking for.

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    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    How does C41 work? Is the process to develop 400 and 200 different? If I have shoot the 200 film at EI200, and want to develop at 400, do I need to tell them? Thanks.
    C41 works somewhat the same as B&W, but with an extra step. Color develop, bleach (not present in B&W) and fix.

    The times for all films, regardess of rated (not push) speed, are the same. The normal developing time is around 3:30.

    Most 1 hour photo labs that I've seen will not push (or pull) your film. However, most of them do process for a little longer than reccomended; my local lab runs about 10 to 15 seconds longer than normal; their loginc is that customers often complain about underexposed film, and the slight push helps compensate for this (less complaints).

    Your best be is probably to do this yourself, which is apparently not too hard ...

    I'm going to try this myself at one point.
    Last edited by htmlguru4242; 04-21-2006 at 04:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    Derek Lofgreen's Avatar
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    If c-41 has no time difference for dev then why does the local "pro" lab by me charge extra for each stop of push or pull? Seems like pushing and pulling is done in the camera with c-41 or am I missing something?

    D.

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