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  1. #1

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    I need 2 minutes exposure for a good print in my darkroom

    Hi everyone,
    I am quite new to using a colour darkroom. Altough I have printed succesfully at my school in colour. I have been setting up my darkroom at home, and went printing today.
    I succeeded in getting fine print. But I need 2 minutes exposure to get a print with the right density. I used f 5.6.
    2 minutes seems a bit long to me. I am used to 30 sec. or something, or faster. What could be the issue?
    I have my chemicals at 33 degree celcius, like the manual suggests, and have development time set to 60 seconds, also according to the manual.
    The lens is a fine schneider componon S f1/2.8 50mm.
    One other thing is the paper used. I used kodak ULTRA sheets 8 x 7 inch or something like that. Only is was not stored cold in the store, so the store gave me a big discount. they said it was fine paper to experiment and find my way around in the darkroom without spending to much money.

    Has anyone an idea, on why the 2 minutes?

    THANKS A LOT for letting me know. ALL the best - SAM

  2. #2
    glbeas's Avatar
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    You didn't mention the filter pack. If you wind up with values on all three colors then you create neutral density which will drag out the exposure times. Reciprocity failure may then exert its influence at that point.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #3

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    What sort of enlarger and bulb are you using? They vary quite substantially in brightness. For instance, my first enlarger (a Durst C35) required very long exposures compared to my second and current one (a Philips PCS130 with PCS150 color controller). The difference was at least a factor of 4 (two stops), although I never timed it precisely, so that's a bit of a guess. If you're using an enlarger that's particularly dim, that could be the explanation.

    Also, have you done B&W printing with this enlarger? In my experience, modern color papers require shorter exposures than do modern B&W papers. If you're seeing the opposite, it could be your paper or developer is to blame, or perhaps you've got some neutral density filtration in place for color but not for B&W.

  4. #4

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    thanks for the replies.
    I use a DURST m605. I believe it has a 100w halogeen lamp inside. the DURST m805 at school used 16 seconds at f8 for a good density.
    Chemicals are fresh by the way.
    With neutral density filtration you mean, using for example: Y30,M50,C70 instead of Y0,M2,C40?

    Greetings Sam

  5. #5
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    Check if the lamp has metal on the inside of the bulb. It might be old and dim. Also check if it is correctly seated in the lamp holder.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by game
    thanks for the replies.
    I use a DURST m605. I believe it has a 100w halogeen lamp inside. the DURST m805 at school used 16 seconds at f8 for a good density.
    Chemicals are fresh by the way.
    With neutral density filtration you mean, using for example: Y30,M50,C70 instead of Y0,M2,C40?

    Greetings Sam
    Hi, you probably already know this, but you are not supposed to use cyan filtration, only yellow and magenta. Also, when I learned, we were told to keep the exposures at about 10 seconds.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by game
    I use a DURST m605. I believe it has a 100w halogeen lamp inside. the DURST m805 at school used 16 seconds at f8 for a good density.
    I'm not familiar with this model, so I can't comment on it specifically.

    With neutral density filtration you mean, using for example: Y30,M50,C70 instead of Y0,M2,C40?
    Yes; however, in case you didn't know, something like Y0/M20/C40 would be pretty bizarre. If you're using such filtration, then it could be a sign of a problem with the paper or chemistry -- or it could be that the scene was shot under unusual lighting conditions. Typically, you'll use yellow and magenta but not cyan filters.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Shiu
    Hi, you probably already know this, but you are not supposed to use cyan filtration, only yellow and magenta.
    AFAIK, that's just because using all three filters produces neutral density filtration, which has the effect of increasing exposure time, and as a general rule shorter exposure times are preferable to longer ones. On rare occasions it might be necessary to use cyan filtration but not magenta and/or yellow in order to correct for odd lighting or some other peculiar color effect. FWIW, I routinely use all three because my enlarger (a Philips PCS130/PCS150) is bright enough that if I didn't do so, all my color prints would be overexposed. (Although technically I'm not using CMY filtration, since the Philips uses an additive design. I'm really reducing the intensity of the red, green, and blue light sources. Still, it works out to the same thing.)

  8. #8

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    2 minutes sounds very long for a colour print. Even 30 seconds wouldn't be short. I wonder if you've hit recpircotiy failure?

    Try making a print with the lens wide open.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    2 minutes sounds very long for a colour print. Even 30 seconds wouldn't be short. I wonder if you've hit recpircotiy failure?

    Try making a print with the lens wide open.
    1. recpircotiy failure, I have seen that word before (spelled differently) What does it mean?
    2. I have always been thought that when enlarging the lens should preferably be on f8 or smaller. Never fully opened...

    Some more info on the above would be appreciated very much.
    Thanks everyone! Sam

  10. #10

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    If this model of enlarger has interchangeable mixing boxes you might check what is installed. A 35mm mixing box will significantly speed things up if a larger one is installed. Also try changing the lamp if you haven't already - given large cyan filtration and long exposure times it may be on the way out.

    Regards,
    Roger.

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