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  1. #11

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    I use Fuji Crystal Archive with no fix or wash between dev. and blix. I am sure I have read somewhere that this is what Fuji recommend. Anyhow it works well for me using a Nova 2 slot processor at 35c in Fotospeed or Paterson(RIP) chemicals, with another 2 slot processor for the print stabilisor/brightener.

  2. #12
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    PE, thanks for the reply.

    Mick.

  3. #13

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    I emailed the manufacturer of my chemicals, amaloco, and this is what they said.

    about dev time and temperature:

    recommended ra4 time+temp is 45seconds @ 37degree celcius.
    They say it is possible to get similar results with lower temperatures and longer times. temperatures above 39 celcius on the other hand could cause damp in the machine and below 32 could results in a colour desaturation, which I actually find quite interesting. Does anyone knows more about this?

    About the water bath:
    using a water bath is not wrong, but should be refreshed on a regular base, read after every 10 prints, because elsewhise the white in the prints will be off white and eventually even get a tint.
    They recommended a S90 acid stopbath. Temperature should be raised 1 degree because development will stop directly.

    So I think I will roder some S90 next time I'll be developping.

    Thanks for the replys, and maybe someone can elaborate on the below 32 degree experiment.
    - SAM

  4. #14

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    Stop bath

    If the second tank could keep the bleach/fix 85 F, then skip the stop bath. The function of the bleach/fix is to stop the development action and couple the cyan dye layer (red), and removes unexposed silver.

  5. #15

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    I don't know what 85 farenheit means in celsius, but the bath has no from of heating, so I guess it's room temperature.
    Sam

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stack8
    If the second tank could keep the bleach/fix 85 F, then skip the stop bath. The function of the bleach/fix is to stop the development action and couple the cyan dye layer (red), and removes unexposed silver.

    Sorry, but the blix has no action whatsoever on producing cyan dye.

    In fact, bad blix can have the opposite effect on some color papers and films and can change cyan dye back into the colorless leuco dye.

    PE

  7. #17

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    The bleach in the bleach fix solution does in fact couple the cyan dye.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stack8
    The bleach in the bleach fix solution does in fact couple the cyan dye.

    Stack8;

    I am sorry, but I helped design the blix for Kodak color paper and have coated several versions of the paper myself. I know how the reactions take place and know, in fact, that the cyan dye is completely formed in the color developer.

    Kodak T1920 paper from about 1968 was the last color paper that relied on a bleach to form dye from leuco dye. Even this paper required ferricyanide bleach, as the ferric EDTA bleach was too weak to oxidize the leuco dye. In this case, the yellow dye was in the leuco form, not the cyan, and was oxidized to the color form.

    Some papers can reverse this reaction in the presence of depleted blix and form leuco cyan dye. These prints are reddish after processing, and have retained silver and silver halide.

    For a complete rundown on the chemistry see the US patent by Edens and VanCampen.

    PE

  9. #19

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    If this were film I'd be concerned that the stop bath isn't heated as I understand the grain size can become larger due to the temperature shift from warm to cooler at the stop bath. However I guess grain/dye cloud size is not a concern for print paper. When processing film I always made sure all baths (except the wash) was consistant, and so I did the same when I processed color paper. I always used an acid stop and had repeatable results.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terence Spross
    If this were film I'd be concerned that the stop bath isn't heated as I understand the grain size can become larger due to the temperature shift from warm to cooler at the stop bath. However I guess grain/dye cloud size is not a concern for print paper. When processing film I always made sure all baths (except the wash) was consistant, and so I did the same when I processed color paper. I always used an acid stop and had repeatable results.
    AFAIK, grain size is not influenced by temperature changes. I have heard this and consider it a myth.

    Can you cite a reference Terence?

    If you cannot, I will continue to consider it a myth, as I never encountered it during my years developing photo products.

    Thanks.

    PE

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