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  1. #1

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    using a stopbad with colour?

    Hi everyone,
    I have managed to get a proper colour print out of my machine this weekend. I'm thinking still about one thing though. My machine has a bath for develloper, then a unheated bath, then one for blix, then a few unheated ones for washing.
    Right now I fill up bath1 with develloper, bath two with water, bath three with blix, and the rest again with water.
    I was talking about this with a guy from school, and he pointed me on the fact that develloping does not stop when the paper is in bath2 filled with water. Seems he's right about that.
    So develloping time is not right the way I do it, can be the only conclusion.
    He said he uses a two bad system + washing in which the Blix bad is placed directly after the developper. Only with my machine that is unpossible since the second bath is unheated.
    I use amaloco chemicals, and they have a stopbath chemical called S10 I believe. Should I use that?

    If not what should I do? and also, what are the concequences of my current method(1.developper 2.water 3.blix)?

    Hope to get these questions solved, with a little help from you guys.
    THANKS - SAM

  2. #2

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    You can't use indicator stop bath. But any plain stop bath should work fine. I just use water and vinegar.

    If you always do things the same way I wouldn't worry. You said you've gotten a good print without it? Why would you change?

  3. #3
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    I would think that the exit rollers from the developer bath would squeegee most of the developer from the paper, whilst the paper is in the cooler water bath, any developer is being diluted thereby lessening any on-developing.

    Once in the bleach/fix bath, the paper is finally finished and then only has to go through the water wash bath at the end.

    Does this machine (whatever it is) have a dryer at the end?

    For many years I drum developed colour negative paper and used a stop bath after development. This was to ensure a controlled stop of the development, followed by bleach/fix in a not rushed time.

    As your process will be identical, each and every time a piece of paper goes through, I cannot see that you will have a long term problem.

    If you colour correct for the actual process you are using, then you will have a nice print.

    If you maintain the bleach/fix bath correctly, then I see no real issue with longevity problems.

    It seems that you have gotten yourself to a stage where you are happy with your colour prints, enjoy them and make many more.

    There are so many ways of making a good colour print, you seem to have made another way.

    Mick.

  4. #4

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    You are certainly right about that.
    Only it is not really like I am at a certain stage yet. this weekend was my first time in a colour darkroom, and also the first colourprint I ever made. I just happened to be satisfied with it.
    I might give Amaloco a call, and see in what cases the S10 stopbath is helpfull and if they'd recommend it.
    thanks, it is good to know that my way is not wrong perse.
    SAM

  5. #5
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    You cannot use a wash after the RA color developer, you must go into a stop of either 1 or 2% acetic acid.

    Either that or you should go directly into the blix.

    You can use indicator stop, but test it first as it can stain some papers.

    PE

  6. #6
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    PE, just a question.

    If one does a wash of a consistant type, as in through a R/T machine in the above scenario, would it matter that much from a longevity point of view, as opposed to a very strict quality controlled type of RA4 processing?

    I ask this because a friend who has just bought an old B&W R/T machine has pretty much the same scenario as above.

    I had mentioned using a stop bath but he was of the opinion that the squeegeeing effect of the exit rollers would virtually eliminate 99% of the excess developer with only the developer still in the emulsion(s) causing more developing.

    From what I have seen and with our rudimentary testing, which was printing and developing in my R/T machine, then taking some exposed paper over to his darkroom to gauge the effectiveness and/or differences.

    For what it's worth, there appeared to be almost no difference, except for a density difference that was just, and I mean just different, if you looked extremely hard.

    Very interesting outcome, we thought.

    Mick.

  7. #7
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    Mick;

    Since color films and papers have multiple layers, when you wash, the development stops quickly in the top (cyan) layer, less quickly in the magenta, and can continue in the yellow for the entire wash time at 100 F. (I have personally tested this at EK and demostrated it. It was actually used in the EK drum process but had to be used with a special developer to prevent non-uniformity problems. (this order is specific to paper, the order is reversed for film)

    So, the result with the RA developer is having a blue-yellow shift and nonuniformity as it does not contain the 2 special ingredients needed for an after development wash.

    PE

  8. #8

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    I always included a stop bath and a wash cycle between developer and bleach/fix steps. I do that for both Kodak RA-4 and Tetenal.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran
    I always included a stop bath and a wash cycle between developer and bleach/fix steps. I do that for both Kodak RA-4 and Tetenal.
    A stop and wash will not hurt. It is just a plain wash that will hurt multilayer color materials.

    PE

  10. #10

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    I start to get stains in my 4 slot Nova, middle two being water only, after a few prints.

    My conclusion is it works ok if you make a few prints and change water. It is easier to use the acid bath.

    When I used to use drums, 4 water rinses were always fine, but that again was always fresh water.

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