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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    Oh, one more thing: I don't know about the Evanston, IL area, but if you're willing to do mail-order photofinishing, try ABC Photo Lab in Connecticut or PhotoWorks in Seattle, Washington. Neither is a pro lab, but in my experience they're both high-quality consumer labs. Pro labs are likely to do still better work, but will charge more.
    Both of them charge $9 for 4x6 prints from a 24exp roll. I think that's too much.

  2. #12
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    Boy all of the shops around here charge at least $9.99 for a 24 exposure roll and about $12.00 for a 36, how much do you think it should cost? Better quality costs more money, you have already stated you were not happy with the quality you got at Osco?

    Just curious.

    R.

  3. #13

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    I concur with Roxi331; the saying "you get what you pay for" definitely applies to commercial photofinishing. Near me, drug store 1-hour labs charge about $8.00 for 4x6-inch prints from a 24-exposure roll. These outfits produce inferior results to ABC or PhotoWorks, in my experience. I'm sure I could find someplace that'd do it for less than $8.00, but I'd be skeptical of the quality. You can go up in quality from ABC or PhotoWorks, but as I mentioned, the price will go still higher.

    If you want quality and low price, my only suggestion is to do it yourself. Freestyle (to pick a vendor at random) sells a C-41 kit for $25.99 that's supposed to do 6-8 36-exposure rolls. That works out to $3.25-$4.33 per roll. If you then scan your prints and get digital prints made for $0.19 each for half the shots on each roll (I'd seldom want to keep more than 50% of my shots, hence my "half the shots" assumption), that works out to about $6.67-$7.75 per 36-exposure roll, or a buck or two less for a 24-exposure roll. The downside is that you'll put a lot of labor into saving a fairly small amount of money. The upside is that you'll have more control over the process, the results will be better, and you'll be less likely to get scratched or otherwise damaged negatives (assuming you're competent in the darkroom). If you've got a full darkroom with an enlarger, you can make your own prints, too. The cost will be comparable to that of getting digital prints made at a minilab, but the effort involved in making them will be much greater. Personally, I don't think it's worth the bother for 4x6-inch color prints, but I might think differently if I were more proficient at color printing.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    I concur with Roxi331; the saying "you get what you pay for" definitely applies to commercial photofinishing. Near me, drug store 1-hour labs charge about $8.00 for 4x6-inch prints from a 24-exposure roll. These outfits produce inferior results to ABC or PhotoWorks, in my experience. I'm sure I could find someplace that'd do it for less than $8.00, but I'd be skeptical of the quality. You can go up in quality from ABC or PhotoWorks, but as I mentioned, the price will go still higher.

    If you want quality and low price, my only suggestion is to do it yourself. Freestyle (to pick a vendor at random) sells a C-41 kit for $25.99 that's supposed to do 6-8 36-exposure rolls. That works out to $3.25-$4.33 per roll. If you then scan your prints and get digital prints made for $0.19 each for half the shots on each roll (I'd seldom want to keep more than 50% of my shots, hence my "half the shots" assumption), that works out to about $6.67-$7.75 per 36-exposure roll, or a buck or two less for a 24-exposure roll. The downside is that you'll put a lot of labor into saving a fairly small amount of money. The upside is that you'll have more control over the process, the results will be better, and you'll be less likely to get scratched or otherwise damaged negatives (assuming you're competent in the darkroom). If you've got a full darkroom with an enlarger, you can make your own prints, too. The cost will be comparable to that of getting digital prints made at a minilab, but the effort involved in making them will be much greater. Personally, I don't think it's worth the bother for 4x6-inch color prints, but I might think differently if I were more proficient at color printing.
    Interesting idea. However I don't have a dark room nor have I ever worked with one. I'm guessing that would require a good amount of knowledge to use properly and get good results? I think I could probably seal off the laundry room or a bathroom and make it into a dark room. I think I could also save a little money by making my own film canisters. However scanning them wouldn't really work as my current scanner seems to have a lot of noise and hotspots that show up on scanned images. Besides, my reason for buying this ELAN was not for digital images.

  5. #15

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    Dear reup2000,

    The problem with taking film to the local Osco/Target/Walgreens is that the quality varies so much. The good news is that the Qualex processing that film from the Chicago area goes to is quite good. If you can wait two days, drop you film off at Dominick's (Kodak service, not generic). For quicker turn around you might want to hunt around a bit. My local Target in the western suburbs made a big upgrade in equipment last year, including the Kodak software for "Perfect Touch" service. I use them for anything I don't want to wait for.

    Neal Wydra

  6. #16

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    Processing film to negatives doesn't require a complete darkroom, just a room that can be made completely dark for transferring the film to a developing tank (or even just a changing bag, which is a light-tight bag with built-in gloves so you can manipulate what's inside), a developing tank, a thermometer, scissors, a few bottles, chemistry for whatever process you're running, and probably a few odds and ends that I'm forgetting. Only the developing tank, chemistry, and (if you use one) changing bag are specialized items that need to be bought from a photo supplier like Freestyle, B&H, or Adorama.

    Check this site for a basic introduction to B&W processing. The basic principles are the same for color; it's just the specific steps that are different. (Developer, bleach, fix, and stabilizer for color, vs. developer, stop bath, fix, and rinsing agent for B&W. Both processes also involve water rinses.) The trickiest part about color is that it's got to be done at a higher temperature -- 100F vs. (typically) 68F or 75F for B&W. The cheapest way to manage this is to use a water bath to bring the chemistry to the right temperature.

    If you decide to pursue this course, I'm sure the people here can help you with any questions you might have. If not, good luck in finding a commercial photofinisher that'll do a good job at a price you can stomach.

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