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  1. #11

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    It's masked like C-41, but IIRC the mask is slightly fainter and more yellow than typical C-41 masks. Of course, C-41 masks vary in color from one film to another. My own eyeball judgment is that the ECN-2 films' masks aren't all that far from the C-41 norm, but they are a bit different.

  2. #12
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Now only historical interest:

    EK did produce a film that had a distinctly different mask a few years ago: Primetime 5620 640T. It was unprintable, unless you wanted a weird, muddy mess. It was intended for direct transfer to video so the colour could be taked care of during transfer. For the time it was a high speed film with comparatively low graininess. Unfortunately the radical nature of the film caused problems for colourists (the guys who transfer film to video) and it never really stood a chance. I was involved in the field tests in a small way, and made a short with it - entirely at f/1 and 16⅔ fps (that's 50/3: three fields per film frame at 25 fps PAL, slightly jerky). EK made sure that the transfer was a good one and I was happy with the result.

    Even by modern standards it was not grainy. See the two curves below. One for 5229 Vision2 Expression 500T and one for 5620. Note how the sensitometric curves for 5620 do not have the typical RGB separation (indicating the mask colour) that most colour neg films have - typified by 5229. Also notice how shallow the curve is compared to 5229, which isn't a contrasty film. The lower contrast gives a slightly false graininess comparison: if the contrast of the 5620 has to be increased to give a good image, the advantage is lost. You had to light for it. That didn't help its reputation.

    Best,
    Helen
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 5620Diff.gif   5229rms.gif  

  3. #13
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    So back to the original question; since the word on the street seems to be that this can be C-41 cross-processed.

    Does anyone have suggestions for times / temperatures?

  4. #14
    Helen B's Avatar
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    "Does anyone have suggestions for times / temperatures?"

    If you use C-41 chemicals then C-41 times and temperatures will apply. The only difference is what happens to the Rem-Jet. One-shot chemicals are one option, filtering the contaminated solutions with a coffee filter is another.

    Best,
    Helen

  5. #15

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    If you use the C-41 process then you will have to insert a stopbath before the bleaching step. I would suggest a standard 3% solution of acetic acid. Allow the film to remain in the stop for 2 minutes. At this point the film can be exposed to subdued room illumination. Hang the film up and using a damp photo quality sponge, gently, and with one continuous motion, wipe the rem-jet coating from the back of the film. Rinse out the sponge thoroughly and repeat the process until all the coating has been removed. Do not touch the emulsion side of the film at this time. Respool the film onto the reel and continue with the rest of the C-41 process.

    If any particle of the rem-jet coating contacts the emulsion it will stick and cannot be removed. So only wipe the back of the film and do it very carefully. Avoid forcing the coating into the sprocket holes -- use only gentle pressure. Removing the backing before the bleach will prevent particles from contaminating any other solutions and you can get by with only filtering the developer solution.

    BTW, the rem-jet coating consists of carbon particles dispersed in a binder which dissolves in alkaline solutions. In the ECN-2 process the film is first soaked in an alkaline prebath to loosen the coating which is then removed with a water spray. The film then passes into the developer. This has to be done in total darkness which makes it impractical for home processing.

  6. #16
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    I use C41 home kits for processing eastman films (usually from discarded shortends). These films are masked, and usually are difficult to print conventionally. Scanning them takes care most of the colour cast problems resulting from non-standard processing methods.

    The black backing (I believe part of its function is to "lubricate" the film as it passes through at high speeds through the motion picture camera) can be removed in sodium carbonate solution, stale Dektol, or a laundy-strength solution of TIDE detergent . I prefer using Tide- put this and the film in a basin, and rub off the black backing with your fingers or with the help of some car chamois.

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