Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,933   Posts: 1,585,553   Online: 794
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    rfshootist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Old Europe
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    387
    Images
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    Though it isn't something that belongs here: there is a very wide range of qualities of inkjet print. It is possible to have a noticeably greater density range with a colour inkjet than with a chromogenic print. The way in which shadows and highlights are rendered in an inkjet print is not an inherent property of the ink/paper combination, it is controlled by a combination of things like the input file, the ink settings and the printer profile. The wide density range is there, how it is used it is up to the person printing.
    Best,
    Helen
    Dear Helen,
    tho the original question was concerning film the thread slipped a bit towards OT, my fault. But the limitations of the printing process made me curious. I think we now are getting to the point where we better should move to the gray area before we get trouble here ;-)

    Your last info is contradictionary to what my friend told me, but, as you said, you can't do it with every printer or ink system and the tuning of the software is a decisive point too, especially if it comes to B&W. Means tho best case you get all these 10 stops on the paper which the 4.2D of an average consumer scanner is able for. AFAIK my friend works with a not too sophisticated ink system, could be therefore his achievable dynamic range is limited.

    I should add tho that some stops more would not be reason enuff for me to buy an inkjet, there is a bunch of good reasons to stick with the traditional process anyway. I think we all know these reasons good enuff, not necessary to explain anything here.

    Best regards,
    bertram
    A la recherche du temps perdu: www. bersac.de

  2. #12
    rfshootist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Old Europe
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    387
    Images
    51

    correlation of ISO and dynamic range ?

    Quote Originally Posted by rfshootist
    Dear Helen,
    tho the original question was concerning film the thread slipped a bit towards OT, my fault.
    bertram
    Yes and it made me forget another ( maybe dumb) question I wanted to ask too: Is there a correlation between ISO and dynamic range ? Like higher ISO= reduced range ? I would deny it becuase I cannot see any technical causality. Do I miss anything ?

    Time to learn more about that all, I always just press the release button and let me surprise...........

    bertram
    A la recherche du temps perdu: www. bersac.de

  3. #13
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,556
    Images
    65
    The range of tones in a reflection print are limited by the physics and optics of reflection print materials. This means that the image is limited to a range of densities between about 2.2 and 0.1. To look good, the final image should have a contrast of about 1.5, and from this you can figure out what the range is in stops of exposure.

    The range of tones in a slide are similarly limited to a range of about 3.5 and 0.2. This is with an average contrast of about 1.7.

    A reflection print actually has a much higher tonal range than we commonly see, nearly matching a slide, but to reveal it, one must overcome the physics of surface reflection and illuminate the print with a very very strong spotlight. In that case, you can see above the 2.2 limit imposed by diffuse illumination and view the extended range that is blocked by the multiple surface reflections absent in a transparency.

    Generally, the tonal range is not influenced by a films ISO speed, however, some films suffer from limited tonal range through design or through faults. The tonal range of a neg-pos system is more a function of both the film and paper. Negative films when printed and reversal films, when printed or projected, will generally exhibit similar overall tonal ranges everything else being equal, but the negative film will always have the edge in latitude while any projected image will display a longer tonal range due to the extended dmax available. Negative films will also always display more accurate color, while reversal films will display more exaggerated color due to contrast and inherent chemistry.

    PE

  4. #14
    rfshootist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Old Europe
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    387
    Images
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    A reflection print actually has a much higher tonal range than we commonly see, nearly matching a slide, but to reveal it, one must overcome the physics of surface reflection and illuminate the print with a very very strong spotlight. In that case, you can see above the 2.2 limit imposed by diffuse illumination and view the extended range that is blocked by the multiple surface reflections absent in a transparency.
    PE
    Fascinating, I never thought about this possibility to make more details visible on a print. And thanks for confirming my assumption concerning ISO and dynamic range.
    As always the whole technical discussion gets really intersting first when the numbers are put in relation to the limits of the human perception. And then it also turns out first who the real experts are who have gained their knowledge in practical work and who are those who live on hearsay.
    I had similar experiences in that never ending resolution and sharpness discussion.
    Thanks to all the friendly people who have posted here, for taking the time. I have learned some new lessons !

    Bertram
    A la recherche du temps perdu: www. bersac.de

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin