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  1. #1

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    Velvia 100 magenta

    I just had a look at some 120 velvia 100 transparancies that I had shot and had developed a few months ago but never had a chance to take a look at until now. I noticed that in the shadows, an object that was supposed to be grey came out looking very magenta. Is this just a case of the processing being off (i wouldn't think it was very likely with this pro lab but theres always a chance) or is this just a quality of velvia 100 that we have to live with?

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Well with the old velvia if you underexposed the shadows it would go blue on you, I have not shot enough of the new 100 to really know what color the shadows being underexposed would be..

    R.

  3. #3
    roteague's Avatar
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    I haven't found that to be the case, if anything I've found Velvia 100 to lean more towards blue, like Kodak VS100.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  4. #4
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    I haven't found that to be the case, if anything I've found Velvia 100 to lean more towards blue, like Kodak VS100.
    Robert,

    your E100VS goes blue? hmm weird, I have always had more magenta in Kodak films than I have in Fuji films when the exposure was wrong...interesting.

    R.

  5. #5
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxi331
    Robert,

    your E100VS goes blue? hmm weird, I have always had more magenta in Kodak films than I have in Fuji films when the exposure was wrong...interesting.

    R.
    Roxi331, that is just my impression. I haven't shot enough to really know much about it.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #6

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    It is my understanding that there are at least 4 factors that govern this type of problem. Any reflections from a magenta object in the scene will be most apparent in your neutrals of any scene photographed with color film. Then you have the characteristics built into the film and its storage and handling thru the whole photographic chain from start to finish which will cause deviations...this includes how YOU handle the film and expose it. The you have the processing deviations from normal which influeces how colors, among others thing get reproduced. You also will be at the mercy of the lab chosen. A lab that is set up to give the very best results with Kodak will have an differing effect on Fuji films and vice versa.

    If you find this film interesting and of use to you try a second roll from a different emulsion batch from a supplier that cold stores their film and turns it over rapidily..harder to do in these digi days. Send it to a pro lab that has optimized their system for Fuji. Make sure that you use the film within the parameters set by Fuji.

    At that point you can decide whether or not to continue using Velvia 100 for the work you wish to do.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  7. #7

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    Daylight exposures: I am getting bluer shadows with Velvia 100F than with E100VS. The shadow areas look more natural with E100VS, though the rest of the image seems warmer, almost like having used a warming filter (though not magenta cast).

    Night/after sunset exposures: Velvia 100F skies look more magenta. E100VS skies are a saturated deep blue, definitely not natural, but the effect I wanted. More accurate would be Astia 100F.

    Anyway, just my experiences, and the plain Velvia 100 is probably a bit different than the 100F. Another thing I found odd was that on long night exposures E100VS has a slight blue shift; this is something of an advantage for what I want to achieve, since I can use lighter blue filtration than I need for Velvia (82A or 82B, compared to 80A). It might be possible that developing chemistry has something to do with this.

    Ciao!

    Gordon

  8. #8
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    Are you this isn't just a colour temperature issue? The light changes throughout the day and I've read that Kodak looks better in the US than it odes in the UK.

    Does anyone actually bother to use a colour temperature meter before shooting?

  9. #9
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    A lab that is set up to give the very best results with Kodak will have an differing effect on Fuji films and vice versa.

    If you find this film interesting and of use to you try a second roll from a different emulsion batch from a supplier that cold stores their film and turns it over rapidily..harder to do in these digi days. Send it to a pro lab that has optimized their system for Fuji. Make sure that you use the film within the parameters set by Fuji.
    Good idea. The lab I use, Calypso Imaging, is setup to use Fuji processing.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  10. #10
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Holliday
    Are you this isn't just a colour temperature issue? The light changes throughout the day and I've read that Kodak looks better in the US than it odes in the UK.

    Does anyone actually bother to use a colour temperature meter before shooting?
    Unfortunately Gary very few of or any of us use color meters to gauge the color temperature that I know. At this point due to cost and weight of these meters, most color transparency photographers rely on their experience and/or tests of the films with filtration when needed/appropriate.

    I think that unless Fuji makes some changes to the color of Velvia 100 that seems is being reported throughout the world, we are going to have to live with or figure out our own personal filtration for the film in at least certain conditions.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

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