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  1. #11

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    Hey Donald,

    If you decide to work with WCI: when I last spoke to Rich Seiling, he was very much in favor of using transparency film versus print film where possible (scans better IIRC), and Provia versus Velvia due to the increased shadow detail ("we can make Provia look like Velvia, but not vice versa"). Rich does carry some Portra 160 with him for his own shooting, but uses it only when contrast exceeds what chrome film can handle.

    I shoot Velvia when I can, Provia when I must, and print film when I have no choice, and this seems to mesh well with WCI's workflow.

    Best regards,
    Eric

  2. #12
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Leppanen
    Hey Donald,

    If you decide to work with WCI: when I last spoke to Rich Seiling, he was very much in favor of using transparency film versus print film where possible (scans better IIRC), and Provia versus Velvia due to the increased shadow detail ("we can make Provia look like Velvia, but not vice versa"). Rich does carry some Portra 160 with him for his own shooting, but uses it only when contrast exceeds what chrome film can handle.

    I shoot Velvia when I can, Provia when I must, and print film when I have no choice, and this seems to mesh well with WCI's workflow.

    Best regards,
    Eric
    Eric,

    It is good to see someone else here that uses WCI. I've used them for the past couple of years and really like their work, and the workflow works perfectly for me. I've had them make prints for me as large as 30x40, and was very satisfied with quality.

    FWIW, I only shoot Velvia or Provia. I never shoot color negative film.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Another attraction of shooting slide film, if you want to work with WCI and treat them like a regular lab, is that it's self proofing. I just tell them "match the slide" or give the same kinds of instructions I would give to a conventional lab (dodging/burning, color correction in CC units, "this detail has to be sharp," etc.), and they do it.

    I like Provia 100F and Astia myself. Velvia 50 was usually too saturated for my taste. I haven't tried Velvia 100F yet.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #14
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I like Provia 100F and Astia myself. Velvia 50 was usually too saturated for my taste. I haven't tried Velvia 100F yet.
    I'll set some (Velvia 100) aside for you when you come over here, so you can try it out.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Thanks, Robert.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16

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    OH MY GAWD, Donald. You can't be serious! You'll be just another calendar photographer out there shooting pretty photos with absolutely no artistic content in them!!

    :^))

    Welcome to the colorfull side of the Force, young Master Miller...

    Anyway, I suggest getting a box each of Fuji Velvia 100, Provia 100F, and Astia 100F and compare. I use Provia almost exclusively, but do carry some Velvia for flat lighting situations, like cloudy days. I like the look of Fuji transparencies better than Kodak when I did comparisions in the past, and it seemed like Kodak would constantly change their 4x5 film offerings more than Fuji did, so there was much less learning new film stocks with the Fuji route...

    Good luck and better break out that spot meter.

  7. #17
    Ole
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    Personally I don't like Velvia - it tends to oversaturate the greens so that everything looks the same. Since summer in Norway is a million different shades of (quite saturated) green, I prefer films with mid- to low saturation. Then later in the year I go to more saturated films like E100VC to emphasise the reds and yellows.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #18
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Personally I don't like Velvia - it tends to oversaturate the greens so that everything looks the same. Since summer in Norway is a million different shades of (quite saturated) green, I prefer films with mid- to low saturation.
    Think "warm polarizer" ... and see what you get. I live on a tropical island, and everything is green year round, and it works for me.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #19

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    For sheet film, I've been using Ektachrome Plus (EPP) with pretty decent results. EPN is just about as good. My choice is mostly been based on what is available or on hand. For medium format I like Kodak 100UC the best with 400UC falling slightly behind. I like these films very much, but 100UC is not available in sheet sizes or 220 (400UC is available in sheets and is a possibility). Kodak 160NC has excellent color, but Western scenics need a bit more punch than it gives. I disliked the old Velvia 50, but the newer Velvia 100 (_not_ 100F) may be a good film for this use.

  10. #20
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    I suggest you shoot some neg and some slide. Have both drum scanned to print at 300 ppi, print each on Fuji Crystal Archive, and each on Ciba.
    Compare and choose what you like.
    On the show circuit guys sell a gazillon of the Fuji as "more natural" color. My Ciba's tend to be "expressive," and highly saturated.
    Good luck.

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