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  1. #11
    kb244's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxi331
    Well if their pricing policies are the same as all the stores I worked in, the 030205 on the top of the price tag indicates they received the product in stock over a year ago, which would lead me to believe that the kit is out of date and possibly has gone bad, E-6 chemistry can be very sensitive to storage conditions, again, my guess based on what you have posted and your images, looks like something is going wrong in the color developer stage which is not working correctly for color or reversal.

    R.
    *grumbles*
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

  2. #12
    kb244's Avatar
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    Any advice for 'Next Time...'
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

  3. #13
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kb244
    Any advice for 'Next Time...'
    If possible, I would order a kit from one of the larger volume sellers like B&H who have a tendancy to turn over their chemistry quicker, you can also make your own E6 chemistry...I can't find the link to the page right now, but here is a link to information on E6 developing.

    http://www.bonavolta.ch/hobby/en/photo/e6.htm

    R.

  4. #14
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    It appears that there may be a problem with the 10.009144643 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Cyan Dye (to Record Red Light); 6.902812504 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Magenta Dye (to Record Green Light); and 9.122236657 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Yellow Dye (to Record Blue Light). Your light waves may be shedding electrons.

    But it is probably just bad chemistry.

  5. #15
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner
    It appears that there may be a problem with the 10.009144643 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Cyan Dye (to Record Red Light); 6.902812504 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Magenta Dye (to Record Green Light); and 9.122236657 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Yellow Dye (to Record Blue Light). Your light waves may be shedding electrons.

    But it is probably just bad chemistry.
    Hey you be nice!!! Why don't you really tax your mind and go over and talk to Ed Davor about grainy film, he has taxed my mind for the day!

    LOL



    R.

  6. #16
    kb244's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner
    It appears that there may be a problem with the 10.009144643 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Cyan Dye (to Record Red Light); 6.902812504 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Magenta Dye (to Record Green Light); and 9.122236657 Billion Molecules / mm2 of Yellow Dye (to Record Blue Light). Your light waves may be shedding electrons.

    But it is probably just bad chemistry.
    Know of a good way to correct the light waves hitting into my camera, perhaps a device where I can alter the molecules?

    lol
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

  7. #17
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    That sure looks like bad color dev. No idea why it'd come out as a negative, unless you also have bad first dev (and then it should be solid dye, no image at all), but it also looks as if you have some unreacted dye couplers, which could form a faint orange negative image if something removed the dyes along with the silver.

    There's certainly *something* seriously wrong with your chemistry... :P
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  8. #18
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I'm betting that the chemistry was shot. Check your instruction sheet - usually one can determine the chemical "goodness" by the appearance of the various components. I can't remember the composition of Beseler E-6, offhand, but I think (probability = 10%) that Part "B" of the color developer should be "light straw" in color. Significant darkening indicates oxidation/ age-related "shot-ness".
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #19

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    I agree with the others that it looks like bad chemistry. A couple more comments, though:

    First, it looks like the box has had three different price tags on it. Aside from the tag date issues others have speculated about, replacing old price tags with new ones is something you'd expect to see with a product that's been on the shelf for months or even years.

    Second, although IMHO the best bet is to just discard the remaining chemistry, if you're willing to sacrifice a roll, you could try reversing the film with light. You'd develop in the first developer, do a stop bath, expose the film to light, and proceed with the second developer and on through the rest of the steps. I'm by no means an expert on E-6 chemistry, so I wouldn't care to speculate on the probability of your getting useable slides out of this, assuming the chemistry has gone bad; but it might be worth trying. Even if you don't get traditionally good results, it's conceivable you'd get something that would be "off" in an interesting way.

  10. #20
    kb244's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    I'm betting that the chemistry was shot. Check your instruction sheet - usually one can determine the chemical "goodness" by the appearance of the various components. I can't remember the composition of Beseler E-6, offhand, but I think (probability = 10%) that Part "B" of the color developer should be "light straw" in color. Significant darkening indicates oxidation/ age-related "shot-ness".
    Well to give you an idea.

    1st Developer - yellowish clear , but had some small crystal structures at the bottom.
    Color developer Parts - One clear, the other almost black.
    Bleach Fix - Both very very dark
    Stabalizer - only 10ml of it, but was clear with a tint

    needless to say the Color Dev +reversal was almost like a dark black rust color, and the Bleach Fix, was almost like a dark grape soda color.

    ....

    Needless to say, they took back the merchandise, my wife returned it for me while I was at work, since I work 9 hour days, and typically 7 days a week.
    -Karl Blessing
    Karl Blessing.com
    The Bokeh
    Color Film always existed. It's just the world was always black and white till recently.

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