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  1. #1
    digiconvert's Avatar
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    Kodachrome, is it the best ?

    Having just discovered KC 64 I found the results to be pretty stunning. On 35mm it just looks sharper than Fuji films I have used (still waiting or my forst velvia 100 to be developed though) and I really like the look of it on a light box. Now the questions;
    -Why do those who use it continue to do so given the problems in getting it developed and in obtaining scans if you want to use it as part of a semi digital workflow.
    -Is it really so much sharper than other chromes or is it just my initial impression (given that my photography is ,hopefully, improved in the 6 months since I last used 35mm slide film.)

    I know that there will be strong advocates of this film and this may be a pretty dumb set of questions but I am intrigued by the fact that it's still in production despite Kodak's apparent best efforts to make using it as difficult as possible.

    Cheers CJB

  2. #2
    DBP
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    1. I like the look, it matches the way I expect chromes to look.
    2. It's extremely archival.
    3. The grain is as fine as anything you will find.
    4. It gives us the nice bright colors, oh wait a minute, don't mean to break into song.

    or maybe I do

    Mama, don't take my Kodachrome
    And leave your boy so far from home
    Mama, don't take my Kodachrome away

  3. #3
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    I love Kodachome, and have since the days of the ISO 25 kodachrome, the problems in getting it processed in addition to not being able to get the 25 version, which was stunning has turned me away from it to a more mainstream film that I can get processed in a quick manner, I have never heard anyone against kodachrome, but the problems associated in this day and age for the working photographer is just not worth the trouble, the 64 was okay and the 200 is terrible in my opinion.

    It is no more difficult to scan kodachrome than it is to scan traditional B&W film, I have scanned tens of thousands of koda slides with no problems at all.

    R.

  4. #4
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Im going to use it! processing is 13, compared to 10 with slides, but its cheapher than velvia 100 and lasts longer
    Marko Kovacevic
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  5. #5

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    Of all of the transparency films, I have always liked Kodachrome the best, slides I took in the 60s are just as bright and clear as the day I had them processed. I still have a couple of rolls, but printing has become a problem as I cannot get any direct printing materials I have moved to negative film. When I get time I want to experiment with making internegatives and print R4.

  6. #6
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765
    Im going to use it! processing is 13, compared to 10 with slides, but its cheapher than velvia 100 and lasts longer
    Processed correctly and stored correctly, Velvia lasts a good amount of time as well, I still have my first Velvia slides when the film was first introduced that look as good as the day they were processed, yes Kodachrome has better archivial properties, but the E6 slides will last a good long time as well if stored properly.

    R.

  7. #7

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    Obstensibly the latest Fuji chrome films have improved archival characteristics: see http://www.fujifilm.com/products/pro...echnology.html

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by digiconvert
    Having just discovered KC 64 I found the results to be pretty stunning. On 35mm it just looks sharper than Fuji films I have used (still waiting or my forst velvia 100 to be developed though) and I really like the look of it on a light box. Now the questions;
    -Why do those who use it continue to do so given the problems in getting it developed and in obtaining scans if you want to use it as part of a semi digital workflow.
    -Is it really so much sharper than other chromes or is it just my initial impression (given that my photography is ,hopefully, improved in the 6 months since I last used 35mm slide film.)

    I know that there will be strong advocates of this film and this may be a pretty dumb set of questions but I am intrigued by the fact that it's still in production despite Kodak's apparent best efforts to make using it as difficult as possible.

    Cheers CJB

    It's a film with a very specific look, not something you'd use for anything.
    It looks very vintage, like something from 50's, so It's nice for that kind of a retro look, but some types of work require a more modern look.

  9. #9
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed_Davor
    It's a film with a very specific look, not something you'd use for anything.
    It looks very vintage, like something from 50's, so It's nice for that kind of a retro look, but some types of work require a more modern look.
    Now I have to say, this is a funny statement Ed, I have never heard Kodachrome described this way, could you please define "Vintage" and "Modern" for me...

    If I could get a hold of some fresh ISO 25 Kodachrome, I guarantee you it would look as modern as anything around!

    LOL



    R.



    Tell me Ed, is this kodachrome retro, or is it modern film, this is a very low resolution scan, the image was taken in the field with a softfocus filter for a job I did a few years ago, tell me if it is "Vintage" or "Modern" film, it was used in a very large ad run here in the states.

  10. #10
    dmr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxi331
    Now I have to say, this is a funny statement Ed, I have never heard Kodachrome described this way, could you please define "Vintage" and "Modern" for me...
    I see Kodachrome as being "vintage" in that it does not have the vivid saturation that many of the newer films have. Let's face it, people (most of them lately, anyway) want colors to pop. Saturated films sell.

    Maybe you could say that Kodachrome shows colors the way they are, as opposed to the way some want them to be.

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