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  1. #11

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    I use drum because I don't like to work with the chemicals in the dark but also I use the chemical only once in the drum so the result would be more consistent than with tray as the chemical gets weaken with every print processed.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    I don't think that's true. Yes, drums use very low volumes of chemicals, but the chemicals are only good for one or two sheets before they're exhausted. When you use trays, you can process many more sheets in a larger volume of chemistry.

    Where the drums would have a cost advantage would be if you want to do a small number of prints and don't plan to do more for many days. In that case, much of the capacity of the chemistry you mix for trays would be wasted because the chemistry would go bad, whereas you could mix up a smaller quantity of chemistry for drum use.

    Given the setup overhead (getting everything out, mixing any quantity of chemistry, etc.), I personally prefer to wait until I've got lots of prints to do. I then do it in two or three sessions. For that sort of scenario, drums offer no chemistry-saving advantage over trays.
    I've no problem getting full stated number of prints from RA-4 chemicals. I know the developer is supposed to go bad but if used in a reasonable period of time [basically months not days] it keeps just fine. Big gain for me was using a pre-wash. Before that the paper would suck up developer so when it went back into the bottle the headspace would increase. That led to developer death plus the lost developer.

    Setup/cleanup is also easier for me with drums. I put my three bottles of chemicals plus a few bottles of wash water in the water bath and walk away. When I come back it's all up to temperture. I do the intial wash in the drum so when I'm done it's a quick rinsie of the drum and leave everything in the sink to dry.

  3. #13
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    You can safely handle color paper under a Wratten series 13 safelight. Instructions are probably available on Kodak's web site. I use 2 bulbs directed away from the paper handeling area, and have 15W bulbs in them.

    Processing at 68 degrees in a tray is a snap. I have posted detals here and elsewhere on this.

    PE

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I've no problem getting full stated number of prints from RA-4 chemicals. I know the developer is supposed to go bad but if used in a reasonable period of time [basically months not days] it keeps just fine. Big gain for me was using a pre-wash. Before that the paper would suck up developer so when it went back into the bottle the headspace would increase. That led to developer death plus the lost developer.

    Setup/cleanup is also easier for me with drums. I put my three bottles of chemicals plus a few bottles of wash water in the water bath and walk away. When I come back it's all up to temperture. I do the intial wash in the drum so when I'm done it's a quick rinsie of the drum and leave everything in the sink to dry.
    Nick. As you will know from kindly helping with my learning curve for the colourstar 3000. My quest for knowledge hasn't gone away but more of that in my thread later. I am a Jobo drum user. Can you expand on the use of pre-wash? I assume this involves washing the exposed print in the Jobo drum with water at or about 35 degrees C?

    I now use Paterson dev and have noticed that it certainly uses dev quickly. The replenishment rate specified by Paterson is barely enough to cover the rate of use. It's now a while since I used Tetenal and memory can play tricks but Tetenal replenishment rates seemed to be lower than Paterson maybe it was absorbed into the paper more slowly.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

  5. #15

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    That's it really. Add some warm water. Let it rotate for 15 seconds or so. Dump it out. It'll pre-heat the drum. Soak the paper with water so it doesn't just suck up developer. It helped me with Supra III which was giving a green cast without the pre-wash. I didn't have that problem with Endura but it doesn't seem to hurt anything.

  6. #16
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    Why use cc filters at all? when i go to the lab i ask them not to use filters and i like these better than my filtered results
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  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765
    Why use cc filters at all? when i go to the lab i ask them not to use filters and i like these better than my filtered results
    In traditional (non-digital) color printing, color filters are necessary to get proper color. If you just exposed the paper using unfiltered light from a bare light bulb, similar to what you'd do with graded B&W paper, you'd get something with massively wrong color -- in most cases it would be way too red, unless I'm spacing out on the color filtration effects and typical filtration values. The color process is designed to work this way, but I don't claim to understand all the reasons, details, and tradeoffs involved.

    If you go to a lab and ask for "no filtration," I'm sure they'll do one of three things: educate you, ignore your request, or adjust their machine's settings in some other way (such as disabling the more advanced computer-driven color-correction features).

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    In traditional (non-digital) color printing, color filters are necessary to get proper color. If you just exposed the paper using unfiltered light from a bare light bulb, similar to what you'd do with graded B&W paper, you'd get something with massively wrong color -- in most cases it would be way too red, unless I'm spacing out on the color filtration effects and typical filtration values. The color process is designed to work this way, but I don't claim to understand all the reasons, details, and tradeoffs involved.

    If you go to a lab and ask for "no filtration," I'm sure they'll do one of three things: educate you, ignore your request, or adjust their machine's settings in some other way (such as disabling the more advanced computer-driven color-correction features).
    I think they ajusted it to only get rid of the orange mask color cast, they came out perfectly balanced Vs before, when i didnt ask for it
    Marko Kovacevic
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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    That's it really. Add some warm water. Let it rotate for 15 seconds or so. Dump it out. It'll pre-heat the drum. Soak the paper with water so it doesn't just suck up developer. It helped me with Supra III which was giving a green cast without the pre-wash. I didn't have that problem with Endura but it doesn't seem to hurt anything.
    Thanks Nick. I currently use the new Fuji Crystal Archive but I'll give it a go. I suppose it's a question of balancing the extra time for the pre-wash as against the saving in developer.

    pentaxuser

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