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  1. #1

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    New at colour developing, please help!

    To anyone who can help;

    I've finally got colour paper, the only thing is that I am new at this. I've found a decent guide, but I've noticed in several guides it says you need to do colour paper processing in complete darkness. Is this totally necessary, or can I get away with the red light on? I have also noticed that several guides have mentioned using a roto drum? Can I get away with using the usual four bath solution (like with B&W)? I am using RA4. Thanks to anyone who responds.

  2. #2

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    You must process in the dark. You can process in trays.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  3. #3

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    It has to be done in total darkness. No red light. You can use the tray if you're comfortable to do that in total darkness. I always use drum as I don't feel comfortable handling the chemicals in darkness.

  4. #4
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    RA4 is developer and bleach-fix. Temp control is crucial, as is replenishment. Also, be very careful handling paper in total darkness. The paper is easy to fingerprint. Dean
    p.s. It used to be worse. Ektaprint C was six chemicals: first dev, color dev, bleach, fix, hardener and stabilizer. DH
    dphphoto

  5. #5

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    Thanks everyone

  6. #6

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    The issue of the need for total darkness continually arises in RA4 processing threads. There are some safelights you can use such as DUKA 10 or 50. Basically these are sodium lights which work on a wavelength which doesn't affect RA4 paper. They are expensive, especially the bulbs, and unless you use them on a low setting they may affect any colour analyser in terms of exposure and correct colour.

    These lamps shouldn't be switched off to avoid probems with enlarger exposure or correct colour filtration but have a shield inside the lamp which progressively covers the sodium bulb to reduce the light intensity to a safe level.

    pentaxuser

  7. #7

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    To elaborate a bit, you can use B&W papers with a safelight because they're sensitive to blue and green light but not to red light. To reproduce the full range of color from a color negative, though, color papers must be sensitive to blue, green, and red light, so a traditional red (or amber) safelight is unsafe for color paper. Exposed to a red light, a color paper would produce a cyan fog. Kodak, and probably others, have documents showing the spectral sensitivities of their color papers on their Web sites, so you can do some digging to find the details, if you're interested. Safelights such as those that pentaxuser mentions work by emitting light in a very narrow band of wavelengths that corresponds to a dip in the overall spectral sensitivity of color paper.

  8. #8

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    Unless tey have changed their web pages Kodak has a lot of detail on processing times at various temps for Ektaco;or paper. Processing in the dark is NOT hard to do..
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  9. #9

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    Kodak made a safelight filter supposedly for colour paper. It's VERY dark. #13 I think. It might be okay if you're never turning on the white lights. OTOH if you expose a sheet. Process then turn on the lights to look at it you'll never adjust to the low light levels.

    Drums will save you a lot of money on chemicals.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Drums will save you a lot of money on chemicals.
    I don't think that's true. Yes, drums use very low volumes of chemicals, but the chemicals are only good for one or two sheets before they're exhausted. When you use trays, you can process many more sheets in a larger volume of chemistry.

    Where the drums would have a cost advantage would be if you want to do a small number of prints and don't plan to do more for many days. In that case, much of the capacity of the chemistry you mix for trays would be wasted because the chemistry would go bad, whereas you could mix up a smaller quantity of chemistry for drum use.

    Given the setup overhead (getting everything out, mixing any quantity of chemistry, etc.), I personally prefer to wait until I've got lots of prints to do. I then do it in two or three sessions. For that sort of scenario, drums offer no chemistry-saving advantage over trays.

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