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  1. #1
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Kodacrome questions

    1. Should i keep this film in my fridge? my camera store didnt.
    2.What type of colors should i expsct? im used to velvia 100
    Marko Kovacevic
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  2. #2
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    It's always best to store film in the fridge or freezer.

    Kodachrome has a different look than Velvia, I think you need to shoot it to see - my words won't help you much.

  3. #3
    Markok765's Avatar
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    I know its best, but the store said it was because of the longevity of kodacrome
    Marko Kovacevic
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  4. #4
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    I store all of my slide films in the fridge and I stored all of my Kodachrome in the fridge, print films depends on what it is, general consumer film is stored in a cool place, pro films like NPS, and such in the fridge, the storage in a cold enviorment helps slow or stop aging of the films, which allows you to shoot the film after the expiration date and still have not problems.

    R.

  5. #5
    reellis67's Avatar
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    Kodachrome has a long life after being developed, but it can still be damaged by high temperatures before exposure. I would store it in the fridge and take it out an hour before you want to shoot with it.

    Modern films reflect the current trend toward hyper-saturated color, but Kodachrome does not. The colors will likely appear somewhat 'flatter' than those of your other film if you compare them side by side. In my experience, the color Kodachrome gives are rich, but not saturated to the point of being unrealistic. With 64, you should see no real grain but still have nice, sharp images. With 200, the grain is a bit more apparent, but the colors are still natural looking.

    - Randy

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    Dear Marko,

    The fridge won't do any harm, and will indeed slow deterioration, but Kodachrome can stand almost anything because the dyes are not incorporated in the emulsion as they are in all other slide films. I have carried Kodachrome in India in warm weather for weeks at a time (including motorcycle touring).

    As for the 'oversaturaed colours' of modern films, this is disputable and seems to depend quite a lot on the age of the person you are talking to. Most older photographers are used to films with very low colour saturation, compared with the real world, and each time a film comes out with more saturation they yell 'Oversaturated!'

    Certes, Kodachrome looks a bit flat next to many modern films.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765
    1. Should i keep this film in my fridge? my camera store didnt.
    2.What type of colors should i expsct? im used to velvia 100
    Hi Markok765, keep it in your camera and use it, dont believe everything you hear in a camera store about Kodachrome. This is a recent Kodachrome 64. It will look the same 50+ years from now, try that with Velvia. Expose it carefully or you won't like it. Regards.
    Last edited by Iskra 2; 09-28-2006 at 09:41 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    david b's Avatar
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    Marko,
    you're 13 years old? How much Velvia 100 have you shot?

  9. #9
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    Marko,

    Kodachromes are known for very good bold reds, oranges, and yellows. They produce a more flat less vibrant green and blue than you will be accustomed to for the newer E6 films such as Velvia 100.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  10. #10
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    The one thing you have to care about Kodachrome longevity is that while it is the best slide film ever in terms of its keeping properties during storage, it is also a very fragile one during projection. Its longevity is cut short dramatically if you project it a lot. If you only scan or make prints from it, then it's not a worry, but you might want to avoid showing it on a screen every weekend.

    (I got that info from the book called "The permanence and care of color photographs : traditional and digital color prints, color negatives, slides, and motion pictures" by Henry Wilhelm, 1993)
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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