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  1. #1
    frugal's Avatar
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    Really magenta Kodak EIR

    Well I got my first roll of Kodak EIR back from the lab yesterday. Overall, I'm really happy with the results but I did have a question about the filtration.

    I had read that the recommended filter is a deep yellow filter (wratten 12) and rating the film at 200, or at least as a starting point. I didn't have a deep yellow filter so I used a yellow filter (wratten 8) and still tried the film at EI 200. The density looks fine so my exposure was good. The main "problem" (whether it's a problem is debatable) is a huge pink/magenta look to a lot of the shots. This is particularly evident on the first half of the roll, I shot it in an old graveyard hoping to get a nice warm-cool split with the stone graves going blue and the trees going magenta-red. Instead, most of these shots are predominantly magenta. It was a hot sunny day so was this just a case of there being too much IR or could some of this be compensated for with a different filter?

    In classic fashion, the shots that I'm happiest with are the ones I did on the 2nd half of the roll after I'd gotten tired with shooting the graveyard and just walked around experimenting with how it would react with my more typical subjects.

    I hope to have scans of the roll reasonably soon so I might post an example if that would help.

  2. #2
    ZorkiKat's Avatar
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    Hi

    I've only had the chance to use Ektachrome IR once, and used a K2 (yellow filter for BW) with it since I didn't have the Wratten 12 or R72 filter then.
    The film was already past its expiry date by about a year and was exposed at EI 200. It was used mostly under tropical sunlight. The resulting pictures didn't have any magenta cast in them, and came out looking like typical colour IR shots. The filter you used may not have caused the magenta cast-
    but then again, IR photography is already tricky, and colour makes it even more. It's always subject to a lot of things- karma included

    Like what you observed, foliage goes magenta and stone goes rather blue.




    These shots were made with a Ukrainian FED-1 rangefinder, a 50mm lens, and a Russian Ж-2 (yellow#2) filter.

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    "不管黑猫白猫能抓到老鼠就是好猫。" 邓小平
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  3. #3
    frugal's Avatar
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    Your first example shot is a lot more like what I was hoping to get. In a lot of my graveyard pictures though the stone went magenta too. I suspect it's more just the type of stone or the fact that the graves are really old and have a lot of moss and lichen on them so there was probably enough organic material for them to go magenta too. Definitely salvageable for some, just not what I expected (which is part of the fun of shooting the film in the first place).

  4. #4

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    I've shot exactly 2 rolls with it, and for the majority of the frames used a deep yellow filter, too. I shot a few frames with an orange filter and actually preferred the color cast.

    Was yours processed E6? I sent mine to a lab in Florida that would only process with modified C41. I have read that E6 will exaggerate the magentas.

    A couple examples:

    with a yellow filter:




    With an orange filter:


  5. #5
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    Frugal,
    Can you post a scan of your image? I've shot a few rolls of EIR and had them processed by the E6 process. The images that ZorkiKat posted are what is typical of E6 processed film shot with a yellow filter.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  6. #6
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Some E-6 proceses need to have the time adjusted upwards in the first developer for EIR, could be the lab didn't do that. I've seen the results of the misdevelopment to be very heavy magenta results. I was using a Unicolor E6 kit then and didn't realise the adjustment was needed. This is where its nice to do your own E6 so you can calibrate the development to the film.
    Gary Beasley

  7. #7
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    There is also a possibility of IR sensors being left on. This can fog the film giving it an allover kind of magenta look.

    Here is a link of several I have online....

    http://www.RobertHall.com/missions.html
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  8. #8
    frugal's Avatar
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    Okay, I should clarify, it's only on a specific set of shots where it's predominantly magenta, a series of shots in an old graveyard. I was expecting the grave stones to go blue while the grass and trees would go magenta (similar to the examples that Zorkikat posted). The grass and trees did go magenta as expected but so did the grave stones. These shots are at the beginning of the roll but I have 2 shots before them that don't exhibit the overall magenta look and the 2nd half of the roll doesn't have it either (other than in organic material) so that leads me to believe that the processing was done properly (which was E-6).

    I guess what I'm asking is it possible for some stone to reflect enough IR to go magenta and/or was it that there was enough moss and lichen on the stones to do it? Is it possible to adjust some of that effect with a different filter on the camera or would that likely kill the magenta-red effect in foliage as well?

  9. #9

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    the gravestones were reflecting more IR light then you thought then.

  10. #10
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frugal
    Okay, I should clarify, it's only on a specific set of shots where it's predominantly magenta, a series of shots in an old graveyard. I was expecting the grave stones to go blue while the grass and trees would go magenta (similar to the examples that Zorkikat posted). The grass and trees did go magenta as expected but so did the grave stones. These shots are at the beginning of the roll but I have 2 shots before them that don't exhibit the overall magenta look and the 2nd half of the roll doesn't have it either (other than in organic material) so that leads me to believe that the processing was done properly (which was E-6).

    I guess what I'm asking is it possible for some stone to reflect enough IR to go magenta and/or was it that there was enough moss and lichen on the stones to do it? Is it possible to adjust some of that effect with a different filter on the camera or would that likely kill the magenta-red effect in foliage as well?
    I would say that there must have been enough moss and lichen on the stones to do it. It doesn't take much at all.
    Diane

    Halak 41

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