Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,669   Posts: 1,481,751   Online: 906
      
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Belgium near seaside
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    79
    Images
    3

    Fuji superia 100/135

    Got back from holidays in Toscane. At midday the colors look very flat and without texture. I suppose this is due to the harsch light in Italy at that time of the day. LAte afternoon and evening colors were much warmer. Camera: OM 2, overexposed the film with 1/2 stop.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Bucharest, RO
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by BBonte
    ... overexposed the film with 1/2 stop.
    I am thinking overexposing 1/2 stop a low-contrast negative film is right. At least this is what I'm doing with acceptable results from my point of view.

    I stopped using Fuji Superia 100 for the same reason: lack of contrast, flat pictures. For negative film I switched to Fuji Superia 200. It has more contrast and it is not so grainy.

    If I need more "punching" colour I use slide film (Fuji Provia).

    Quote Originally Posted by BBonte
    ...I suppose this is due to the harsch light in Italy at that time of the day. LAte afternoon and evening colors were much warmer.
    You might have a point here. The place where I take most of the shots (the town where I'm living, I think it's natural) is at the same latitude as Toscana. Probably Superia 100 is the film you are using normally when you are at home. At 44 - 45° latitude, midday light can really ruin your picture at summer time. You may find a better light in winter. This is another reason why during long trips I'm carrying at least 2 cameras with me: one with negative and another one with slide film.

    Is somebody else having a different personal experience? I think this problem is interesting: connecting latitude and season with the preffered colour film.

    You should check this forum for some opinions, too.

    Kind regards,
    Adrian
    [COLOR=Gray][SIZE=2]Inspiration comes of working every day.[/SIZE][SIZE=1] - Charles Baudelaire
    [/SIZE][SIZE=2]All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.[/SIZE] - [SIZE=1]Aristotle
    [/SIZE][SIZE=2]Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it.[/SIZE] - [SIZE=1]Salvador Dali[/SIZE][/COLOR]

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Belgium near seaside
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    79
    Images
    3
    Hello Adrian,
    So I should have used slide film. I had the same results with Superia 200 on my Rollei 35. Is Kodak color negative film a better choice for this kind of harsh light conditions ?

  4. #4
    PhotoJim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Regina, SK, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,217
    Try getting the negatives in question reprinted. The detail is likely there.

    It is more difficult to shoot in midday but it is not impossible.

  5. #5
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  6. #6
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,985
    Images
    281
    The polarizing filter is a good suggestion, a cheaper way to get a similar effect although not as pronounced is a UV light filter. A really good lens shade always helps too.
    It is difficult to get good color in the middle of the day. I've never gotten real good at it. Mostly I use color mornings and evenings, and black & white during the day (for much better contrast control).

    I love the Superia 200, and used to use Superia 100 for all my color shots but changed to the 200 for the same reasons as above. I'm not sure I agree the 200 is less grainy than the 100, I would say it's the opposite.
    Like a few others here, I use slide film if I have to have more snap in the colors. I prefer Kodak E100-VS or the newer E100G (I think it's called). Or the EliteChrome Extra Color is fun too.

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #7
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81
    I ordered twenty rolls of Superia 200 and twenty rolls of Superia 400 from 7Day Shop.com this week. They currently have an excellent deal on.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Bucharest, RO
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by huggyviking
    I'm not sure I agree the 200 is less grainy than the 100, I would say it's the opposite.

    - Thom
    You are right, Thom. what I was trying to say was that Superia 200 is not very grainy in general and not by comparaison with 100.

    I'm sorry if I was misleading you.

    Regards,
    Adrian
    [COLOR=Gray][SIZE=2]Inspiration comes of working every day.[/SIZE][SIZE=1] - Charles Baudelaire
    [/SIZE][SIZE=2]All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.[/SIZE] - [SIZE=1]Aristotle
    [/SIZE][SIZE=2]Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it.[/SIZE] - [SIZE=1]Salvador Dali[/SIZE][/COLOR]



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin