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  1. #1

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    E-6 Processing woes

    Hello all ... after a long absense from film shooting I have 'come back'. Unfortunately I had sold off my darkroom equipment except for a film development tank. Well, the first few batches of film were fine, but the plastic/rubber lid began to leak and I think I contaminated the last couple of batches or something, because of the horrible results. Before I mix any fresh chemistry, I need another tank (I've been doing this 'by hand' and don't have a processor, in the past with great results), so I guess I'm asking what tank would you guys recommend for 35mm? I usually process 2 rolls at the time, sometimes 4, but I want one that just won't leak. I've bid on a jobo 'starter kit' but was wondering if this is a good way to go, using the jobo tanks.

    I'm dying to get some good chromes, so do any of you folks have a suggestion or two?

    Many thanks!

    Jack

  2. #2
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Do you need a rotary processor? if not, try the paterson super system 4 tank
    Marko Kovacevic
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  3. #3

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    If you want a lid that doesn't leak get a Jobo. I guess the 1520 if you want a small two reel tank. You'll get to choose plastic or hewes reels. If you later decide 2 reels aren't enough you can just buy the extension, some more reels and run more film in the same tank.

    If you're using a processor then you can consider the 2500 type tanks. But in inversion mode they use a lot more chemicals. OTOH the tanks can also handle 4x5 with a reel change.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765
    Do you need a rotary processor? if not, try the paterson super system 4 tank
    Thanks Mark. I don't need a rotary processor. I looked at the paterson, and it just might be the ticket.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    If you want a lid that doesn't leak get a Jobo. I guess the 1520 if you want a small two reel tank. You'll get to choose plastic or hewes reels. If you later decide 2 reels aren't enough you can just buy the extension, some more reels and run more film in the same tank.
    Thanks Nick, I'm looking at the Jobo. I don't know if it was the leak or my carelessness that caused my problem, but to do inversion processing it seems foolish to be spilling chemicals into my water bath, so this will at least eliminate that problem.

  6. #6
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacko1729
    Thanks Mark. I don't need a rotary processor. I looked at the paterson, and it just might be the ticket.
    I love the paterson system. one question: does it still have the plastic stick you put in the hole and turn to agitate? Your paterson system will last you a long time. Make sure to clean those plastic reels well! the paterson reels are the smoothest plastic and easiest to load IMO
    Marko Kovacevic
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  7. #7

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    Dear Jack,

    Kindermann stainless steel with plastic lids. Much better heat transfer; negligible thermal capacity; last forever (I bought mine second-hand 30+ years ago). I don't think I'd try to do 4 in any tank without a processor, though -- I find a CPE-2 MUCH more efficient.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    Much better heat transfer; negligible thermal capacity

    Actually think both are negatives. They may heat up quicker but the flip side is they cool down quicker. When I get a tank to the right temp I want it to stay there.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Actually think both are negatives. They may heat up quicker but the flip side is they cool down quicker. When I get a tank to the right temp I want it to stay there.
    Not in a water bath -- which you more or less have to use for E6. How much warmer does the first dev have to be to heat a plastic tank and reels to the temperature you want? And then it's the water-bath anyway.

    Sure you can pre-heat, but then, you can do this quicker with stainless.

    I fully take your point, and both are valid approaches, but obviously I prefer mine.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)
    Last edited by Roger Hicks; 08-03-2006 at 06:49 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: misspelled own name...

  10. #10
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I second the vote for Paterson tanks. The reels are easy to load and can adjust to take 127 and 120/220/620 film. You can get larger tanks that will take as many as 8 rolls of 35mm. (I have one of these and it is a big timesaver when I get way behind in my processing. ) I don't use the stir stick that comes with it (which is supposed to be used to get rid of air bells); I invert. All plastic tanks will leak a tiny bit but the leakage I get with Paterson is fine.

    For E6 I use a Jobo processor and tank. The processor is all manual but the Jobo tanks fit magnetically on the spindle which is convenient. I don't like the Jobo reels as much - they are harder to load, although not bad once you get used to them.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

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