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  1. #31

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    Jan 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by isaacc7
    ... It consisted of a modified Mitchell motion picture camera with pin registration, an optical bench, and a conventional color enlarging head was used for illumination. We would use a color analyzer to insure accurate color adjustments. The whole thing was bolted directly into the foundation of the building in order to minimize possible vibrations. The lenses were special Nikkor duplicating lenses. I think they were originally designed to be used in motion picture optical printing machines. There was no helical, movable iris, or anything else that we're used to seeing in a regular lens. They cost something absurd like $1100 back in '73! (snip)
    Isaac
    Cool! First time I have ever heard of using a VisitaVision 8 perf movment to copy slides! Yes, those 105mm f4.5 Printing Nikkors still adorn our Optical Printers; they are now selling for $5 to $6K when they can be found and they depend on bellows movement to focus and camera movement for sizing...

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kino
    Cool! First time I have ever heard of using a VisitaVision 8 perf movment to copy slides! Yes, those 105mm f4.5 Printing Nikkors still adorn our Optical Printers; they are now selling for $5 to $6K when they can be found and they depend on bellows movement to focus and camera movement for sizing...
    Yeah, they were heavily modified to be used as slide dupers. There is an outboard controller for setting the number of exposures and the cameras are run at a rate of about 1 1/2 frames a second, This is the only way to be able to make high quality dupes in large quantities. The rig was made in the mid 80's I think, so all of the controllers are analog controlled. It's all switches, counters, relays, etc. The camera they use for 70mm dupes had to undergo even more modification. I think that they had to rework the sprocket pitch and/or the registration pin movement to make it compatible with the duping film. The owner of the lab claims to be the one that made EK offer the film in that size. He would have to special order an entire batch. The good news is that ensured great consistency from roll to roll, the bad news was that it was a ton of film!

    Isaac
    See my adventures in Yemen here:
    www.isaharr.com

  3. #33

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    BTW, if anyone is interested, the website for Repro Images is:

    http://www.reproimages.com/home.html

    Looks as though they now have a camera to do the 6x17 dupes. I used to contact print them, what a pain in the neck!

    Isaac
    See my adventures in Yemen here:
    www.isaharr.com

  4. #34
    Hans Borjes's Avatar
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    Getting good prints from transparencies was always painful as far as I remember. Looking at the results has always disappointed me, because the original slides are so much better. Maybe it would have been easier not to look at the prints at all and give them away in a closed envelope - the majority of people that are used to get the crappy prints from big labs wouldn't have noticed anyway how bad they are.

    The worst thing that once happened was that the lab lost all originals (as well as the prints) from the selected best shots of my sister's wedding. This was the moment in life I never gave any film or slide into a mass users lab again and turned to professional labs that do the job locally.

    Unfortunately the pro labs are not all better. Especially with 120 film I have never experienced that the slides came back untouched. Sometimes finger prints, sometimes scratches, sometimes dirt. Even when they wear gloves, I would be interested to understand their washing cycles for the gloves, because sweaty gloves will cause smear on the slides as well. They are simply not able to handle 6x6 slides appropriately with an edge of 2mm on each side. I always use tweezers to keep them fat-free.

    As prints are always secondary usage for me, because slide projection is intended, I most recently bought an Epson film scanner and I am happy to say that the labs can now scratch their displays, make as many finger prints on their monitors, and loose as many of my files as they want!
    There is nothing like Scala? There are various alternatives!
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum228/...cala-200x.html

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