Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,933   Posts: 1,585,528   Online: 832
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 36
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    41
    It would be nice to have a DIY E6 formula 'cause who knows how long Kodak will keep packaging their smaller kits. I use the 5L E6 kit, but have visions of my dealer informing me of its discontinuance the next time I go to place an order. I suppose the large sizes will be around longer but that's a lot of chemistry for home use.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,730
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Koch
    Any particular reason for not wanting to use a fogging re-exposure? I have found it to be easier and more reliable than using a chemical foggant. I don't know what Kodak uses now but the E-6 foggant some years ago was a substituted borane which was quite toxic and not something that you wanted to get loose in your darkroom.
    Yes, it would be hell (not to mention stupid on my part and negate all the advantages of a totally automatic process -- it is a 2300 that does everything but pour the vermouth) to stop the JOBO, unthread, expose, restart and finish the process.

    I'd really like to keep it all "in the can" for the duration. IF I had not installed this monster (and I say that with affection), I would be happy to use the British formula I ran across on the web, but I did and I must use ti!

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,730
    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    Have you priced the individual components for making RA4 and C-41. Seems like I did this a few years ago and though the cost was less it was not enough to justify the hassle of stocking and mixing.

    Just my 2 cents,
    Just begining to explore that, but the one link I quoted did a price breakdown and it seem to be VERY economical compared to a kit.

    But then again, math was never my strong suit...

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,730
    Quote Originally Posted by edz
    (snip) The cost to mix one of the open source developers and the cost to purchase (in quantities of 5/10 litres of concentrate or less) is similar if not even higher. Champion, Calbe and others compete well for the market.
    Thanks for the chemical manufacturer's reference; I am attempting to research all possible venues. While Kodak has tons of information, so much it is almost self-defeating and hard to wade through, Champion and Calbe have practically none.

    I should probably just buy Kodak Kits or bulk chemicals until I can wrap my head around all the factors involved.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,730
    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    I've used both mix-it-yourself and commercial chemistry. Concerning costs, the mix-it-yourself approach can result in cost savings, but only if you use relatively modest quantities; for low-volume users, you're looking at inflated per-roll or per-sheet costs from buying small-quantity packages and/or developer going bad because it sits on the shelf for too long. The mix-it-yourself approach, OTOH, enables you to mix whatever quantity you want, so there'll be less waste, and the dry chemicals keep for a long time compared to the solutions. Most of the cost savings is likely to be in the developer, both just looking at the raw numbers without considering waste and because the developer will go bad quicker than the other chemicals.

    Another cost issue is kits vs. individual components. You'll almost certainly pay less if you buy individual components than if you buy a kit. Unfortunately, this complicates buying the stuff, but it's definitely worth looking into the individual components.
    (snip)
    Thanks for all the helpful info; I didn't realize it would be this complex.

    As a general rule, what is the shelf life of the individual components for mixing (not dry and not kits)? Could you, say, buy individual components to make 5 gallons and slowly use them over the year or will they tank rapidly due to oxidization?

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,730
    Oh and one more quick question; can you use butane to displace oxygen in color chemistry containers like you can in b&w?

  7. #17

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Landry
    It would be nice to have a DIY E6 formula 'cause who knows how long Kodak will keep packaging their smaller kits.
    I've only seen one E-6 formula on the Web. I've never used it, and I seem to recall Photo Engineer saying it wasn't "correct" in a thread a few months ago. Still, the formula is "out there" and so could be used in a situation such as you mention, albeit with results that might or might not be acceptable to you. OTOH, even if Kodak discontinues its smaller-sized kits, it's likely you could buy smaller kits from others, so mixing it yourself might not become necessary.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,725
    Quote Originally Posted by Kino
    Just begining to explore that, but the one link I quoted did a price breakdown and it seem to be VERY economical compared to a kit.

    But then again, math was never my strong suit...
    A while ago I put together a spreadsheet to help with calculating such things. It's turned into a bit of a monster, and I've actually just done some updating to the RA-4 pages because of this thread. If you're interested, you can get it from my Web site:

    http://www.rodsbooks.com/formulas.zip

    That's a direct link with no HTML page. It's got both the original OpenOffice.org file and a Microsoft Excel export. You'll need to tab over to the C-41 and RA-4 pages for the relevant numbers. The first page includes raw chemistry prices, which you can check and update if you like, particularly if you think you'd buy in different quantities or from different suppliers than I specify.

    This thread has made me very aware of the fact that I really know very little about the capacities of RA-4 chemistry. Kodak claims 16 8x10 sheets per liter of working solution, but their document goes on to say it can handle up to 40 sheets for "noncritical" applications, and I don't know what sorts of problems would appear between sheets 17 and 40. I've seen posts elsewhere that suggest blix capacity is generally higher than for developer. Some of the RA-4 kits claim higher capacities than Kodak does -- 38 sheets for Tetenal and 58 sheets for Fotospeed. I don't know if they're just being less conservative than Kodak or if their products' capacities really are that much higher.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kino
    As a general rule, what is the shelf life of the individual components for mixing (not dry and not kits)? Could you, say, buy individual components to make 5 gallons and slowly use them over the year or will they tank rapidly due to oxidization?
    This probably depends on the chemistry. I've had Paterson Photocolor II C-41 developer go bad after much less than a year -- but it's delivered as a single-bottle solution that's diluted for use, vs. the multi-bottle solution used by (for instance) Kodak. The latter would probably last longer, but I don't know if it'd last a year once opened.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    Quote Originally Posted by Kino
    Just begining to explore that, but the one link I quoted did a price breakdown and it seem to be VERY economical compared to a kit.

    It all depends on which kit you compare to and how much you pay for your dry chemicals.

    If you have the volume the big mini-lab chemicals are VERY cheap. They get cheaper with every step up in size. OTOH so do the dry chemicals.

    The big cost problem with home C-41 etc is the small kits. Avoid the kits and costs are much closer.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    Quote Originally Posted by Kino
    Thanks for the chemical manufacturer's reference; I am attempting to research all possible venues. While Kodak has tons of information, so much it is almost self-defeating and hard to wade through, Champion and Calbe have practically none.

    I should probably just buy Kodak Kits or bulk chemicals until I can wrap my head around all the factors involved.
    You could look at the Fuji Hunt website to.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin