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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kino
    stop the JOBO, unthread, expose, restart and finish the process.
    When I used color reversal films it was on SS reels. The film does not have to be removed from the reels. Each reel was held about 30 inches from a 250 watt bulb and slowly wobbled around to make sure that light got to all of the film. This took about a minute for each reel, 30 seconds on each side.

    I believe that Kodak now uses dimethylamine borane as their fogging agent. This appears to be somewhat less toxic than the tertiary butylamine borane (RA-1) used previous. Both are neurotoxins and suspected carcinogens and require the use of a respirator when being used. Carefully read the MSDS for both these compounds before deciding to use either of them. I personally would prefer the little inconvenience of light reversal to poisoning myself.

  2. #22
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    E6 chemical reversal now uses an acidic solution of stannous chloride. This solution is not particularly stable itself, and can decompose through aerial oxidation.

    As for the E6 first developer, all of the formulas that I have seen except one published one time in the 90s, have used the wrong developing agents and even though they can give an acceptable color image result in degraded interimage, sharpness and grain. The E6 first developer is a slow acting High Acutance developer with a fogging agent, which is quite different than all B&W and most other color first developers.

    The E6 bleach and fix are adjusted for use with the E6 pre-bleach, while the C41 bleach and fix don't require one. RA blix is entirely different.

    The RA color developer uses a variety of 'odd' salts such as Lithium salts used nowhere else, and it also contains polymers and a unique stabilizing agent.

    I have worked on all of these processes back years ago, and I know what a pain it is to mix them all up from scratch, and how difficult it is to get some of the chemicals. Shelf life of many of them is not good.

    Just to name some odd chemisty, how about citrazinic acid, hydroquinone monosulfonate, ethylenediamine, propionic acid, stannous chloride, Ferric Nitrilotriacetate, and that is just a small percentage of the oddball things you will need.

    PE

  3. #23
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    I forgot to add that if you are going to mix your own, you need a good pH meter, as any deviation over 0.2 at 20 deg C (IIRC) will lead to color shifts, especially in E6.

    PE

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    E6 chemical reversal now uses an acidic solution of stannous chloride. This solution is not particularly stable itself, and can decompose through aerial oxidation.
    I'm glad that Kodak has finally eliminated the use of a very nasty chemical. Do you happen to remember when they made this change?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Koch
    I'm glad that Kodak has finally eliminated the use of a very nasty chemical. Do you happen to remember when they made this change?
    Yes, when they changed from E4 to E6! That was years ago.

    PE

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    You could look at the Fuji Hunt website to.
    Nick,

    I just tried calling Fuji Hunt and they said the chemical and photopaper sales have been transferred back to Fuji Photo Films Inc. and gave me 888-676-3714 to call. The lady made it obvious that she REALLY didn't want to be bothered with my call; typical USA - megacorp support attitude.

    I called this number and got passed around to several departments before I got back to a customer support rep who passed me off to the voicemail of the Ohio Fuji Rep, Gary Dejanes.

    We shall see how responsive they are; I am not hopeful after all that crap.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    OTOH, even if Kodak discontinues its smaller-sized kits, it's likely you could buy smaller kits from others, so mixing it yourself might not become necessary.
    Aside from Kodak and Fuji, I don't think there are any other off-the-shelf sources of E6 chemistry anymore (come to think of it, I've never seen Fuji chemistry available off-the-shelf). Agfa is defunct, Tetenal may be available, but I doubt for very long. Any others that may be available?

    Man, I love E6, but things aren't looking too great.

  8. #28
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    E6 film products have been the hardest hit color product of all due to Digital.

    Color negative is doing well in some markets, as is color paper.

    So, if I were to guess, E6 will become harder and harder to process just like Kodachrome.

    PE

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Landry
    Aside from Kodak and Fuji, I don't think there are any other off-the-shelf sources of E6 chemistry anymore (come to think of it, I've never seen Fuji chemistry available off-the-shelf). Agfa is defunct, Tetenal may be available, but I doubt for very long. Any others that may be available?

    Man, I love E6, but things aren't looking too great.
    I am investigating minilab chemistry with Fuji; they don't sell off the shelf to the public in photo stores.

    Well, Photo Systems Inc. still sells the Unicolor and other re-badged color kits, but they are relatively high in price; al least it sure seems so...

    (Edit) Hey wait, they have a gallon 6 step kit for $25 I had not seen before; not THAT is reasonable.

    Beyond them and the above listed sources, I don't know of others...

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Landry
    Aside from Kodak and Fuji, I don't think there are any other off-the-shelf sources of E6 chemistry anymore (come to think of it, I've never seen Fuji chemistry available off-the-shelf). Agfa is defunct, Tetenal may be available, but I doubt for very long. Any others that may be available?
    There's the Unicolor that's mentioned by Kino (I believe it's sold under various other names, such as Freestyle's house brand). What's the latest on Paterson? The last I heard, they were having supply problems but were still hoping to resolve them and get production started again. If they're successful, we might see Paterson's E-6 chemistry again.

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