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  1. #11

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    Mick and Nick,

    I really don't know what the Tetenal Kit has in the stabilizer, but it was a small package, probably no more than half an ounce of powder, compared to the developer and blix.

    My drying 'place' is a simple length of picture frame hanging wire, stretched across a corner of my darkroom and I use weighted clips; nothing fancy. My dark room is far from being clean-room clean, but dust hasn't been a problem so far. I just turn on a reciprocating fan and leave on the exhaust fan and the film dries quite nicely, as do my graduates and film drums.

    In my garage sits a half-painted half-locker with a thrift store, bonnet-style hair dryer awaiting conversion into a forced air, heated dryer. Don't hold your breath...

    I also like to let my film dry overnight; regardless of format and type.

  2. #12

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    Doesn't the fan kick up dust? I basically have a similar setup but without the fan. Even so the film dries fairly quickly.

  3. #13
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Well my drying wire started life as a wire coat hanger. I have no wish to make a film drying cabinet, nothing against them.

    As far as dust goes, my darkroom has a small wall airconditioner, which obviously blows air around when it's on. This has never been a dust making problem as far as film drying goes.

    I also have a home made light tight exhaust fan in the wall above the main sink, which is always on when I'm in the darkroom.

    Whatever you have as long as the films dry dust free, keep on doing it.

    Mick.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Fagan
    My experience with C41 film drying, is that it drys better than B&W. In other words virtually spot and funny stuff free.
    That's my experience, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mick Fagan
    My stabiliser is 3ml of formaldehyde and 12ml of wetting agent (Ilford's) mixed in 1 litre of water at room temperature.

    I have been using this bath for about 18 years and have never had a problem.

    I believe that formalin has fallen out of favour with the pre-packaged industry and that they may use something else.
    Kodak has been moving away from formaldehyde in the final bath for a while. If you check their processing documents, they specify the use of a stabilizer product for a couple of their older films, and this includes formaldehyde as an ingredient, much like your home-mixed stabilizer. Newer films use a product that Kodak calls "final rinse," IIRC, and this does not include formaldehyde. I don't know precisely what's best for specific non-Kodak films, though, or what the consequences of using stabilizer are for the films that Kodak says should be processed with the final rinse product. My understanding is that using the final rinse product on films that should be processed with stabilizer is likely to result in premature fading.

  5. #15

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    I think if you're using the Kodak or Fuji formalhyde free final wash you need to use thier whole set of chemicals. I'm not sure it's just the film that was changed.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Doesn't the fan kick up dust? I basically have a similar setup but without the fan. Even so the film dries fairly quickly.
    No, it is a small, vertical oscillating fan you can buy at an office supply store, the volume isn't particularly high and it is on the opposite wall as the film that is drying, so the air doesn't directly impinge on the film. The fan simply stirs the air and the ventilation fan extracts the humid air. Combined, they make for a very dry darkroom, even though I am in the basement.

    As a general rule, my darkroom vent fan runs almost 24/7, so maybe that keeps the lighter dust particles out of the air as a general rule?

    Frank

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