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Thread: 400VC vs. 400UC

  1. #1

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    400VC vs. 400UC

    Is it correct to say the difference between 400VC to 400UC is similar to the difference between tri-x and tmax 400, in terms of grain? I love tri-x over tmax 400.

    I know 400UC is newer. more saturated color. What are other differences?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    The small amount of shooting I have done with these two films, the biggest difference I have noticed is the color saturation, I have not noticed much difference in the grain structure.

    Dave

  3. #3
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dxphoto
    Is it correct to say the difference between 400VC to 400UC is similar to the difference between tri-x and tmax 400, in terms of grain? ...
    Probably not.

    Per the Kodak Tech pubs for these films, the "print grain index" for a 4x6 print from a 35mm neg is 48 for 400VC and 40 for 400 UC. The proportion is similar, if not smaller for other print sizes and larger negs. In practical use, Mr. Parker is likely correct that the "biggest" difference is color saturation. Of course, I could be wrong.
    David
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  4. #4
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    There are three "suffixes" for Kodak print films: NC, VC, UC. They mean more or less: Normal, Very and Ultra. The C is meant to be either Colour (saturation) or Contrast: two adjacent areas of different hues but of matched values have a higher contrast at high saturation than at low saturation.

    There are two categories of speed: slow (160 or 100) and fast (400 or 800). That gives the following combinations

    100: UC
    160: NC, VC
    400: NC, VC, UC
    800: no suffix, but I suppose it's got to be like NC

    All of these films use T-grain technology, the same you find in T-Max. The 800 was upgraded recently, so it might have some newer tech in it. So all of these are colour T-Maxes, not coulour Tri-Xes. I have no idea if Kodak or anyone else still produces colour film using conventional grains.
    Using film since before it was hip.


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  5. #5

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    I haven't used much 400VC, but I use 400UC all the time. My experience is that the grain is similar between the two, but 400VC is a bit more contrasty and 400UC is more saturated. 400UC changed recently and became even more saturated. I think they overdid it.

  6. #6
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth
    I think they overdid it.
    After the last wedding I did, I would have to agree, I found myself a bit short on what I normally carry to shoot a wedding and have always shot Fuji, and the local shop had 400UC in stock and no fuji at all, I am telling you, compared to the fuji I used, the UC was REALLY saturated...would make a great fall color print film..

    Dave



 

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