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  1. #11
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Thanks all for the answers! I was curious about this recent fashion because, as Roger points out, these things come and go. I'm sure warm colours were meant to look enticing twenty years ago, and now they spread bokeh like butter.

    That makes me wonder: what if Jim Galli started to shoot food with his delicious Dagors &c?
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Most all food in food photographs is fake or touched up with paints and glazes to make them look right and endure the long sessions with hot lights and not wilt or discolor.

    They showed how to make a 'baked turkey' for a photo session in a television workshop about a year ago, and basically it is all chemistry. They could literally retouch the food to match any photographic system.

    PE

  3. #13
    Amund's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Well, some food would look better out of focus--

    http://www.lileks.com/institute/gallery/
    OMG! The Meat!Meat!Meat! section had me crying in laugther...
    Amund
    __________________________________________
    -Digital is nice but film is like having sex with light-

  4. #14
    Philippe-Georges's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Most all food in food photographs is fake or touched up with paints and glazes to make them look right and endure the long sessions with hot lights and not wilt or discolor.

    They showed how to make a 'baked turkey' for a photo session in a television workshop about a year ago, and basically it is all chemistry. They could literally retouch the food to match any photographic system.

    PE

    Having illustrated a few cookery books right now [http://www.photoeil.be/books/photoeil-library.html], I never faked or touched up the food I was shooting. The only thing I did was substituting ice cream by butter, slightly coloured with the juice of carrots. What is shown on T.V. is show.
    I also never worked with an stylist, I really do not know why.

    Food only looks like food when it IS ‘food’, this is of course a very personal statement!

    Technically, the whole thing is an chain of settings and quality control.
    It starts whit the choice of the film emulsion and goes on whit the kind of coating of the flash ‘bulbs’, the reflectors on them, the filtering, as well on the flash head as on the lens, the calibrating of the E-6 process and, of course, the the use of a good colour temperature meter. The camera format depends on what kind of atmosphere one is seeking. I have shot food on 13c x 18 cm slides whit an Rodenstock Imagon at 1:1 reproduction rate, superb lens. The last book, who will be out at the end of next month, was shot on 35 mm (slides). All film is FUJI Provia 100, to me it is a neutral basis to start with, Polaroïd is the proofing tool. I tried Digital but this is very good for magazines but not that acceptable for books YET.

    Philippe

    P.S sorry again Roger, for my pigeon English!
    "...If you can not stand the rustle of the leafs, then do not go in to the woods..."
    (freely translated quote by Guido Gezelle)

    PS: English is only my third language, please do forgive me my sloppy grammar...

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I don't think there's as much fakery as there used to be. I believe that in the US now, for advertising, the food that is being advertised has to be the real thing, though the surrounding items need not be. You can pick through 20 heads of lettuce to find the perfect lettuce leaves, and you can spray with olive oil and such to improve the gloss, but I don't think you can put shoe polish on the turkey anymore, if you're using the photo to sell turkey.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    The stylist is the artist.

    I once worked in a studio that did a lot of food. We shot Ektachrome.
    I assume that today it is all done digital.
    You are correct about the switch to digital. Until last week I rented a studio apartment to a well known food photog (has worked with all major chefs on numerous publications etc.). He originally used the apartment as a photog studio then as an office.

    Over the course of his five year tenancy he went from full film to full digital.

    BTW: These are some of the food books he shot: http://www.bestwebbuys.com/Ben_Fink-...b-authorsearch

  7. #17
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Most all food in food photographs is fake or touched up with paints and glazes to make them look right and endure the long sessions with hot lights and not wilt or discolor.
    My understanding is that it depends upon whether the image is of a recognized product, or being used for a specific product, in which case you don't have the liberty to falsify the product. There are a lot of things you can do to enhance them, like undercooking the meat, or just a particular lighting angle.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #18
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham
    Over the course of his five year tenancy he went from full film to full digital.
    These guys probably aren't using a run of the mill DSLR, more likely MF digital or a scanning back.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #19
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I wish I had paid more attention to the program and could remember better what I did see, but this was a TV presentation that showed how they prepared various cooked foods, not major brand products, for display in TV programs. IIRC they concentrated on a Thanksgiving dinner including how to prepare a turkey for a long session of photography, and it seems to me they included varnishing the turkey for a well baked brown look.

    Everything they had was inedible. The question that prompted this show, again IIRC, was "What do you do with all of that food after taking pictures of it? Do you give it away to the needy?" and the answer was purporting to show why they didn't. The food was not edible food.

    I'm not saying I agreed with it, but rather just bringing that particular program to your attention. I don't believe I enjoyed the program or I think that I would have remembered more of it.

    PE

  10. #20
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    I wish I had paid more attention to the program and could remember better what I did see, but this was a TV presentation that showed how they prepared various cooked foods, not major brand products, for display in TV programs.
    I remember the show as well, unfortunately, I can't tell you what channel it was on.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

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