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  1. #11

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    Yes, that's the process. When I did it, I pulled the paper out of the processing drum in room light for a few seconds to be sure it was completely exposed to light, then put it back in. That was probably overkill.

    Bear in mind that, as PE and I have both said, the results will not resemble a normal print from a negative on RA-4 paper; the contrast will be high and the colors may be hard to get properly balanced. Feel free to play with the process, though.

  2. #12
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    I would not suggest a high solvent or high sulfite film developer as the first developer. It usually leads to excessively high contrast and large speed losses. The chloride emulsions in Endura paper are very sensitive to these types of developer.

    I use Dektol 1:3 for 1 - 2 mins at 68 degrees for lower contrast. Sometimes I add sulfite to the color developer to push the contrast down even more.

    PE

  3. #13

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    Contamination of RA-4 Chemicals?

    In a shared darkroom facility, contamination of the RA-4 chemicals (in a "COLEX" color print processor) is a concern. Would this type of cross process contaminate or exhaust RA-4 chemicals any more than regular RA-4 print processing, assuming a thorough wash and dry after the first BW developer?

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I would not suggest a high solvent or high sulfite film developer as the first developer. It usually leads to excessively high contrast and large speed losses. The chloride emulsions in Endura paper are very sensitive to these types of developer.

    I use Dektol 1:3 for 1 - 2 mins at 68 degrees for lower contrast. Sometimes I add sulfite to the color developer to push the contrast down even more.

    PE

  4. #14
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    If you develop in a B&W developer and then stop and wash well, there should be no contamination. But, there are differences in the way people work and how efficient their wash cycle is. So, be extra careful.

    PE

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I use Dektol 1:3 for 1 - 2 mins at 68 degrees for lower contrast. Sometimes I add sulfite to the color developer to push the contrast down even more.

    PE
    I believe you once mentioned a chloride restrainer should be used instead of a bromide one in the first developer. I have found this to be so or fog results, so I mix my own first developer and use sodium chloride. I have only used Ansco 130 diluted 1:3 with fair results. Any reason you know of D-72 with chloride might be better?

  6. #16
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    I've done D-72 with chloride, bromide and nothing. All work and give different results in terms of fog and color balance. The only way to tell is trial and error.

    PE

  7. #17
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    For RA-4 reversal process, see my reports at http://www.apug.org/forums/forum40/6...nt-thread.html . I had good results with Dektol formula with reduced bromide.

    BW First Developer does not have any ingredient that would kill a color developer with just finest trace. Just wash the paper well on both sides, using several wash cycles. You have to wash well anyway, otherwise the process won't work; you are going to expose it to the room light, and you don't want to have First Developer on the paper left at that point.

    But start with color negatives first. It is very easy to print color negs optically and have great results.

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