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  1. #1

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    Kodak Supra Endura F

    Hi,

    I have a batch of approximately 6 X 50 packs of the above paper. I took over them from a colleague who left. What process is the papers meant for? They are still viable as to my understanding they only been cut up from a roll like last year.

  2. #2
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    This is color paper meant for the RA process. Both Kodak and Fuji make chemicals for this paper.

    PE

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    So in terms of exposure, i expose it normally like I would a color negative or is it meant for color transparencies?

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    It's for negatives. It's Kodak's current paper isn't it? Or have they changed names again.

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    You use this paper to make color prints from color negatives using the RA color process. The exposure is to be made on-easel using an enlarger.

    PE

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    THe RA-4 Process deals with three colour filters.

    Yellow, Magenta, Cyan

    Dial in the proper values determined by a ring around or other devices, and there you go.

    nlochner
    Where is the art in digital photography?..

  7. #7

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    Great, cos i have been browsing around and i have gotten confliscting statements about the use of the paper, as in its actual exposure with that of a negative film or that with a positive film.

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    Endura can be 'cross processed' in a reversal process to make direct positive prints, but the transparency must be selected with care due to the high resulting contrast.

    This is not to be undertaken lightly. You must have a lot of experience to do it.

    PE

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Endura can be 'cross processed' in a reversal process to make direct positive prints, but the transparency must be selected with care due to the high resulting contrast.

    This is not to be undertaken lightly. You must have a lot of experience to do it.
    To be clear, it doesn't really take anything more than the usual RA-4 experience and knowledge of a few extra steps to do this cross-processing. To do it well may take a lot more experience, though. My own experiments have been interesting but the results are, as you say, very high in contrast and not suitable for most scenes. I've only tried a couple of slides in this way as experiments.

    FWIW, the process I followed was: Expose the paper, develop it in a conventional B&W paper developer (I used E-72), stop it, rinse it, expose it to light, and proceed on with the usual RA-4 processing steps.

    One other point: Commercial labs with a digital workflow can use RA-4 paper in certain types of digital photofinishing equipment to make prints from slides. Once the slide or negative is scanned, it doesn't matter whether it originated as a slide or a negative. This could well be the source of the conflicting information Fixer has found.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    To be clear, it doesn't really take anything more than the usual RA-4 experience and knowledge of a few extra steps to do this cross-processing. To do it well may take a lot more experience, though. My own experiments have been interesting but the results are, as you say, very high in contrast and not suitable for most scenes. I've only tried a couple of slides in this way as experiments.

    FWIW, the process I followed was: Expose the paper, develop it in a conventional B&W paper developer (I used E-72), stop it, rinse it, expose it to light, and proceed on with the usual RA-4 processing steps.

    One other point: Commercial labs with a digital workflow can use RA-4 paper in certain types of digital photofinishing equipment to make prints from slides. Once the slide or negative is scanned, it doesn't matter whether it originated as a slide or a negative. This could well be the source of the conflicting information Fixer has found.
    To clarify on what you have mentioned, is it safe to surmise that in order to obtain a positive image on the color paper from a transparency, i would first need

    1) Expose the image onto the endura paper, develop the paper in a B&W Developer (Ilford Multigrade).

    2) Stop & Rinse it

    3) Expose the image to white light (For how long?)

    4) Develope the exposed print in a RA4 developing process (I will be using a colenta auto processor )

    The result will be a positive image from a trans?

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